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Title: Deposition of epitaxial Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films by pulsed cathodic arc

Abstract

A multicathode high current pulsed cathodic arc has been used to deposit Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films belonging to the group of nanolaminate ternary compounds of composition M{sub n+1}AX{sub n}. The required stoichiometry was achieved by means of alternating plasma pulses from three independent cathodes. We present x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis showing that epitaxial single phase growth of Ti{sub 2}AlC has been achieved at a substrate temperature of 900 degree sign C. Our results demonstrate a powerful method for MAX phase synthesis, allowing for phase tuning within the M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} system.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982741
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2709571; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALUMINIUM CARBIDES; CATHODES; CRYSTAL GROWTH; DEPOSITION; EPITAXY; PLASMA; PULSES; SPUTTERING; STOICHIOMETRY; SUBSTRATES; THIN FILMS; TITANIUM CARBIDES; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Rosen, J., Ryves, L., Persson, P. O. A., and Bilek, M. M. M. Deposition of epitaxial Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films by pulsed cathodic arc. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2709571.
Rosen, J., Ryves, L., Persson, P. O. A., & Bilek, M. M. M. Deposition of epitaxial Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films by pulsed cathodic arc. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2709571.
Rosen, J., Ryves, L., Persson, P. O. A., and Bilek, M. M. M. Thu . "Deposition of epitaxial Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films by pulsed cathodic arc". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2709571.
@article{osti_20982741,
title = {Deposition of epitaxial Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films by pulsed cathodic arc},
author = {Rosen, J. and Ryves, L. and Persson, P. O. A. and Bilek, M. M. M.},
abstractNote = {A multicathode high current pulsed cathodic arc has been used to deposit Ti{sub 2}AlC thin films belonging to the group of nanolaminate ternary compounds of composition M{sub n+1}AX{sub n}. The required stoichiometry was achieved by means of alternating plasma pulses from three independent cathodes. We present x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis showing that epitaxial single phase growth of Ti{sub 2}AlC has been achieved at a substrate temperature of 900 degree sign C. Our results demonstrate a powerful method for MAX phase synthesis, allowing for phase tuning within the M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} system.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2709571},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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