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Title: Finite element modeling of indentation-induced superelastic effect using a three-dimensional constitutive model for shape memory materials with plasticity

Abstract

Indentation-induced shape memory and superelastic effects are recently discovered thermo-mechanical behaviors that may find important applications in many areas of science and engineering. Theoretical understanding of these phenomena is challenging because both martensitic phase transformation and slip plasticity exist under complex contact loading conditions. In this paper, we develop a three-dimensional constitutive model of shape memory alloys with plasticity. Spherical indentation-induced superelasticity in a NiTi shape memory alloy was simulated and compared to experimental results on load-displacement curves and recovery ratios. We show that shallow indents have complete recovery upon unloading, where the size of the phase transformation region is about two times the contact radius. Deep indents have only partial recovery when plastic deformation becomes more prevalent in the indent-affected zone.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982724
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436928; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; NICKEL ALLOYS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PLASTICITY; SHAPE MEMORY EFFECT; SIMULATION; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; TITANIUM ALLOYS

Citation Formats

Zhang, Yijun, Cheng, Yang-Tse, Grummon, David S., Materials and Processes Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, Michigan 48090, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. Finite element modeling of indentation-induced superelastic effect using a three-dimensional constitutive model for shape memory materials with plasticity. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436928.
Zhang, Yijun, Cheng, Yang-Tse, Grummon, David S., Materials and Processes Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, Michigan 48090, & Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. Finite element modeling of indentation-induced superelastic effect using a three-dimensional constitutive model for shape memory materials with plasticity. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436928.
Zhang, Yijun, Cheng, Yang-Tse, Grummon, David S., Materials and Processes Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, Michigan 48090, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824. Thu . "Finite element modeling of indentation-induced superelastic effect using a three-dimensional constitutive model for shape memory materials with plasticity". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436928.
@article{osti_20982724,
title = {Finite element modeling of indentation-induced superelastic effect using a three-dimensional constitutive model for shape memory materials with plasticity},
author = {Zhang, Yijun and Cheng, Yang-Tse and Grummon, David S. and Materials and Processes Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, Michigan 48090 and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824},
abstractNote = {Indentation-induced shape memory and superelastic effects are recently discovered thermo-mechanical behaviors that may find important applications in many areas of science and engineering. Theoretical understanding of these phenomena is challenging because both martensitic phase transformation and slip plasticity exist under complex contact loading conditions. In this paper, we develop a three-dimensional constitutive model of shape memory alloys with plasticity. Spherical indentation-induced superelasticity in a NiTi shape memory alloy was simulated and compared to experimental results on load-displacement curves and recovery ratios. We show that shallow indents have complete recovery upon unloading, where the size of the phase transformation region is about two times the contact radius. Deep indents have only partial recovery when plastic deformation becomes more prevalent in the indent-affected zone.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436928},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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