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Title: Prediction of stochastic behavior in differential charging of nanopatterned dielectric surfaces during plasma processing

Abstract

We investigate differential charging of high aspect ratio dielectric trenches under plasma exposure using a two-dimensional computational model. Rather than considering average fluxes, we track individual ion and electron trajectories within the electric field arising from surface charges on the trench, updating the potentials within the computational domain after each particle. Our results show that, as the trench width shrinks to 100 nm and below, the potentials within the trench oscillate over an ever-wider range. The stochastic charging behavior in turn leads to noticeable changes in the flux and energies of ions passing through the trench.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982706
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2433134; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ASPECT RATIO; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTRIC FIELDS; ELECTRONS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; NANOSTRUCTURES; PARTICLE TRACKS; PARTICLES; PLASMA; STOCHASTIC PROCESSES; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; WALL EFFECTS

Citation Formats

Kenney, Jason A., and Hwang, Gyeong S.. Prediction of stochastic behavior in differential charging of nanopatterned dielectric surfaces during plasma processing. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2433134.
Kenney, Jason A., & Hwang, Gyeong S.. Prediction of stochastic behavior in differential charging of nanopatterned dielectric surfaces during plasma processing. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2433134.
Kenney, Jason A., and Hwang, Gyeong S.. Thu . "Prediction of stochastic behavior in differential charging of nanopatterned dielectric surfaces during plasma processing". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2433134.
@article{osti_20982706,
title = {Prediction of stochastic behavior in differential charging of nanopatterned dielectric surfaces during plasma processing},
author = {Kenney, Jason A. and Hwang, Gyeong S.},
abstractNote = {We investigate differential charging of high aspect ratio dielectric trenches under plasma exposure using a two-dimensional computational model. Rather than considering average fluxes, we track individual ion and electron trajectories within the electric field arising from surface charges on the trench, updating the potentials within the computational domain after each particle. Our results show that, as the trench width shrinks to 100 nm and below, the potentials within the trench oscillate over an ever-wider range. The stochastic charging behavior in turn leads to noticeable changes in the flux and energies of ions passing through the trench.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2433134},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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