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Title: Mechanical design and force calibration of dual-axis micromechanical probe for friction force microscopy

Abstract

A dual-axis micromechanical probe that combines a double cantilever and torsion beams is presented. This probe can reduce the mechanical cross-talk between the lateral and vertical force detections. In addition, dual-axis forces can be detected by measuring the dual-axis displacement of the probe end using the optical lever-based method used in conventional friction force microscopes (FFMs). In this paper, the mechanical design of the probe, the details of the fabrication method, FFM performance, and calibration of the friction force are discussed. The mechanical design and the microfabrication method for probes that can provide a force resolution of the order of 1 nN without mechanical cross-talk are presented. Calibration of the lateral force signal is possible by using the relationship between the lateral force and the piezodisplacement at the onset of the probe scanning. The micromechanical probe enables simultaneous and independent detection of atomic and friction forces. This leads to accurate investigation of nanotribological phenomena and visualization of the distribution of the friction properties, which helps the identification of the material properties.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Micro/Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan and PRESTO, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982680
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2434825; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CALIBRATION; FRICTION; MICROSCOPES; PERFORMANCE; RESOLUTION; SIGNALS; TORSION

Citation Formats

Fukuzawa, Kenji, Terada, Satoshi, Shikida, Mitsuhiro, Amakawa, Hiroaki, Zhang, Hedong, Mitsuya, Yasunaga, and Department of Micro/Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603. Mechanical design and force calibration of dual-axis micromechanical probe for friction force microscopy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2434825.
Fukuzawa, Kenji, Terada, Satoshi, Shikida, Mitsuhiro, Amakawa, Hiroaki, Zhang, Hedong, Mitsuya, Yasunaga, & Department of Micro/Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603. Mechanical design and force calibration of dual-axis micromechanical probe for friction force microscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2434825.
Fukuzawa, Kenji, Terada, Satoshi, Shikida, Mitsuhiro, Amakawa, Hiroaki, Zhang, Hedong, Mitsuya, Yasunaga, and Department of Micro/Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603. Thu . "Mechanical design and force calibration of dual-axis micromechanical probe for friction force microscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2434825.
@article{osti_20982680,
title = {Mechanical design and force calibration of dual-axis micromechanical probe for friction force microscopy},
author = {Fukuzawa, Kenji and Terada, Satoshi and Shikida, Mitsuhiro and Amakawa, Hiroaki and Zhang, Hedong and Mitsuya, Yasunaga and Department of Micro/Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603},
abstractNote = {A dual-axis micromechanical probe that combines a double cantilever and torsion beams is presented. This probe can reduce the mechanical cross-talk between the lateral and vertical force detections. In addition, dual-axis forces can be detected by measuring the dual-axis displacement of the probe end using the optical lever-based method used in conventional friction force microscopes (FFMs). In this paper, the mechanical design of the probe, the details of the fabrication method, FFM performance, and calibration of the friction force are discussed. The mechanical design and the microfabrication method for probes that can provide a force resolution of the order of 1 nN without mechanical cross-talk are presented. Calibration of the lateral force signal is possible by using the relationship between the lateral force and the piezodisplacement at the onset of the probe scanning. The micromechanical probe enables simultaneous and independent detection of atomic and friction forces. This leads to accurate investigation of nanotribological phenomena and visualization of the distribution of the friction properties, which helps the identification of the material properties.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2434825},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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