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Title: Thermally stimulated glow peaks in Ge-doped cultured quartz crystals and their radiation response

Abstract

Ge-doped crystalline quartz has been examined for its thermally stimulated luminescence and has been found to exhibit TL-glow peaks at 100, 200, and 310 degree sign C. While the peaks at 100 and 310 degree sign C have already been noticed in conventionally grown quartz, the new peak at 200 degree sign C, observed in the present studies, appears to be due to the presence of Ge in quartz lattice. The radiation dependence of this peak upon irradiation at 300 K by high energy electrons (1.75 MeV) has been presented and the results have been compared and discussed in terms of the hydroxyl defects in natural, cultured, and Ge-doped cultured quartz.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982661
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2431683; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; CRYSTALS; DOPED MATERIALS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; GERMANIUM; HYDROXIDES; IRRADIATION; MEV RANGE 01-10; QUARTZ; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K; THERMOLUMINESCENCE

Citation Formats

Bahadur, Harish. Thermally stimulated glow peaks in Ge-doped cultured quartz crystals and their radiation response. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2431683.
Bahadur, Harish. Thermally stimulated glow peaks in Ge-doped cultured quartz crystals and their radiation response. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2431683.
Bahadur, Harish. Thu . "Thermally stimulated glow peaks in Ge-doped cultured quartz crystals and their radiation response". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2431683.
@article{osti_20982661,
title = {Thermally stimulated glow peaks in Ge-doped cultured quartz crystals and their radiation response},
author = {Bahadur, Harish},
abstractNote = {Ge-doped crystalline quartz has been examined for its thermally stimulated luminescence and has been found to exhibit TL-glow peaks at 100, 200, and 310 degree sign C. While the peaks at 100 and 310 degree sign C have already been noticed in conventionally grown quartz, the new peak at 200 degree sign C, observed in the present studies, appears to be due to the presence of Ge in quartz lattice. The radiation dependence of this peak upon irradiation at 300 K by high energy electrons (1.75 MeV) has been presented and the results have been compared and discussed in terms of the hydroxyl defects in natural, cultured, and Ge-doped cultured quartz.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2431683},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Cultured quartz crystals with high concentration of Al and Ge have been investigated for their hydroxyl defects upon irradiation at 77 K before and after 300-K irradiation. The hydroxyl defects act as a source of hydrogen to compensate the electron excess defects of aluminum centers during irradiation of quartz crystals. In this study, a comparison has been presented between differently grown Ge-doped crystals and a Sawyer Premium Q crystal. In particular, Ge-H, Al-H, and other H-related defect centers have been investigated and analyzed. During the irradiation process, some new bands appear at the expense of the already existing bands. Amore » novel defect center absorbing at 3,400 cm{sup {minus}1} has been noticed in two of the Ge-doped crystals. This band is a different species of point defects than the one absorbing at this frequency as one of the growth defect bands. A model has been assigned to this radiation-induced band. Other results have been discussed in terms of the fundamental considerations about the quartz crystal lattice.« less
  • With the help of thermally stimulated currents (TSC) the authors studied the basic parameters of centers in Bi/sub 12/SiO/sub 20/, Bi/sub 12/GeO/sub 20/, doped with A1/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/ and Bi/sub 12/TiO/sub 20/. The methods of analysis of the energy position of the centers, independent of the type of recombination (monomolecular or bimolecular), and of charge carriers in the crystals are used. The basic parameters determined include the concentration of trapping centers, the depth of the trapping centers, and the transverse cross section of traps of the doped crystals, by the methodsmore » of thermally stimulated currents and thermoluminescence. It was found that the increase in the photosensitivity at temperatures near room temperature is determined by the concentration of deep centers, which is substantially increased by vacuum annealing of the crystals.« less
  • Nominally pure LiF crystals were irradiated with the same dose (0.85 10{sup 6} R) of gamma rays at ambient and low temperatures (-60 deg. C) and the resulting thermoluminescence (TL) is reported. Various optical and thermal treatments were applied in order to change the concentration of color centers (CCs). The effect of such treatments on the glow curves is observed. Knowing the coloration from optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements made on the same samples, we attribute many of the glow peaks (GPs) to the annealing of F center aggregates. For the present conditions of irradiation and dose, TL processes beginmore » with decay of F{sub 3}{sup +} centers that display a GP at 164 deg. C. F{sub 3}(R) centers follow and are responsible for GPs at 193 and 228 deg. C. A GP at 263 deg. C is ascribed to F{sub 2} centers. Several peaks at temperatures in the range of 280-380 deg. C are associated with impurity perturbed F centers. A GP at 410 deg. C is associated with a complex of aggregated F and H centers. These attributions are accomplished by means of TL spectra, optical transmission spectra, and annealing procedures, and are critically discussed. The experimental data confirm the general trend of thermal stability of CCs, which decreases by moving from simple F centers to more complex ones, and the existence of exchange dynamics among CCs.« less