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Title: Suppression of reabsorption in ultracold gases via modulation of light

Abstract

Reabsorption, the multiple scattering of spontaneously emitted photons in optically thick gases, is a major limitation to efficient optical pumping and laser cooling in ultracold gases. We report mitigation of reabsorption using spatial and frequency modulation of laser light illuminating such gases. We developed a semiclassical model that successfully describes the reabsorption process when frequency-modulated light is present. It was necessary to extend the treatment in the model beyond a simple two-atom picture in order to reproduce our experimental results.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982545
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.053403; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; EMISSION; FREQUENCY MODULATION; GASES; INHIBITION; LASER RADIATION; MULTIPLE SCATTERING; OPTICAL PUMPING; PHOTON-ATOM COLLISIONS; PHOTONS; SEMICLASSICAL APPROXIMATION; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0000-0013 K

Citation Formats

Gorges, Anthony R., Foxley, Ansel J., French, David M., Ryan, Christopher M., and Roberts, Jacob L.. Suppression of reabsorption in ultracold gases via modulation of light. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.053403.
Gorges, Anthony R., Foxley, Ansel J., French, David M., Ryan, Christopher M., & Roberts, Jacob L.. Suppression of reabsorption in ultracold gases via modulation of light. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.053403.
Gorges, Anthony R., Foxley, Ansel J., French, David M., Ryan, Christopher M., and Roberts, Jacob L.. Tue . "Suppression of reabsorption in ultracold gases via modulation of light". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.053403.
@article{osti_20982545,
title = {Suppression of reabsorption in ultracold gases via modulation of light},
author = {Gorges, Anthony R. and Foxley, Ansel J. and French, David M. and Ryan, Christopher M. and Roberts, Jacob L.},
abstractNote = {Reabsorption, the multiple scattering of spontaneously emitted photons in optically thick gases, is a major limitation to efficient optical pumping and laser cooling in ultracold gases. We report mitigation of reabsorption using spatial and frequency modulation of laser light illuminating such gases. We developed a semiclassical model that successfully describes the reabsorption process when frequency-modulated light is present. It was necessary to extend the treatment in the model beyond a simple two-atom picture in order to reproduce our experimental results.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.053403},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 5,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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