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Title: Photon-loss-tolerant Zeno controlled-SIGN gate

Abstract

We model an optical implementation of a controlled-SIGN gate that makes use of the quantum Zeno effect [Franson et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 062302 (2004)] in the presence of photon loss. Gate operation is severely affected. However, we show that by using photon loss codes proposed for linear optical quantum computation (LOQC), performance is greatly enhanced, outperforming LOQC equivalents. The technique can be applied to other types of nonlinearities, making the implementation of nonlinear optical gates much more attractive.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)
  2. Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, Department of Physics, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 Brisbane (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982508
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.052339; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; LOSSES; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; OPERATION; OPTICS; PHOTONS; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUANTUM INFORMATION; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Myers, Casey R., and Gilchrist, Alexei. Photon-loss-tolerant Zeno controlled-SIGN gate. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.052339.
Myers, Casey R., & Gilchrist, Alexei. Photon-loss-tolerant Zeno controlled-SIGN gate. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.052339.
Myers, Casey R., and Gilchrist, Alexei. Tue . "Photon-loss-tolerant Zeno controlled-SIGN gate". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.052339.
@article{osti_20982508,
title = {Photon-loss-tolerant Zeno controlled-SIGN gate},
author = {Myers, Casey R. and Gilchrist, Alexei},
abstractNote = {We model an optical implementation of a controlled-SIGN gate that makes use of the quantum Zeno effect [Franson et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 062302 (2004)] in the presence of photon loss. Gate operation is severely affected. However, we show that by using photon loss codes proposed for linear optical quantum computation (LOQC), performance is greatly enhanced, outperforming LOQC equivalents. The technique can be applied to other types of nonlinearities, making the implementation of nonlinear optical gates much more attractive.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.052339},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 5,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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