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Title: Coherent control of self-trapping of cold bosonic atoms

Abstract

We study the behavior of ultracold bosonic atoms held in an optical lattice. We first show how a self-trapping transition can be induced in the system either by increasing the number of atoms occupying a lattice site or by raising the interaction strength above a critical value. We then investigate how applying a periodic driving potential to the self-trapped state can be used to coherently control the emission of a precise number of correlated bosons from the trapping site. This allows the preparation and transport of entangled bosonic states, which are of great relevance to novel technologies such as quantum-information processing.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982229
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.031607; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; BOSONS; CONTROL; EMISSION; INFORMATION THEORY; INTERACTIONS; OPTICAL MODELS; PERIODICITY; POTENTIALS; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT; QUANTUM INFORMATION; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0000-0013 K; TRAPPING

Citation Formats

Creffield, C. E. Coherent control of self-trapping of cold bosonic atoms. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.031607.
Creffield, C. E. Coherent control of self-trapping of cold bosonic atoms. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.031607.
Creffield, C. E. Thu . "Coherent control of self-trapping of cold bosonic atoms". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.031607.
@article{osti_20982229,
title = {Coherent control of self-trapping of cold bosonic atoms},
author = {Creffield, C. E.},
abstractNote = {We study the behavior of ultracold bosonic atoms held in an optical lattice. We first show how a self-trapping transition can be induced in the system either by increasing the number of atoms occupying a lattice site or by raising the interaction strength above a critical value. We then investigate how applying a periodic driving potential to the self-trapped state can be used to coherently control the emission of a precise number of correlated bosons from the trapping site. This allows the preparation and transport of entangled bosonic states, which are of great relevance to novel technologies such as quantum-information processing.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.031607},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 3,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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