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Title: Observing quantum nonlocality in the entanglement between modes of massive particles

Abstract

We consider the question of whether it is possible to use the entanglement between spatially separated modes of massive particles to observe nonlocal quantum correlations. Mode entanglement can be obtained using a single particle, indicating that it requires careful consideration before concluding whether experimental observation--e.g., violation of Bell inequalities--is possible or not. In the simplest setups analogous to optics experiments, that observation is prohibited by fundamental conservation laws. However, we show that using auxiliary particles, mode entanglement can be converted into forms that allow the observation of quantum nonlocality. The probability of successful conversion depends on the nature and number of auxiliary particles used. In particular, we find that an auxiliary Bose-Einstein condensate allows the conversion arbitrarily many times with a small error that depends only on the initial state of the condensate.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Frontier Research System, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)
  2. (Belgium)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982067
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.022108; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BELL THEOREM; BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATION; CONSERVATION LAWS; CORRELATIONS; PROBABILITY; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT; QUANTUM MECHANICS

Citation Formats

Ashhab, S., Maruyama, Koji, Laboratoire d'Information Quantique and QUIC, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Code Postal 165/59, 1050 Bruxelles, Nori, Franco, and Physics Department and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040. Observing quantum nonlocality in the entanglement between modes of massive particles. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.022108.
Ashhab, S., Maruyama, Koji, Laboratoire d'Information Quantique and QUIC, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Code Postal 165/59, 1050 Bruxelles, Nori, Franco, & Physics Department and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040. Observing quantum nonlocality in the entanglement between modes of massive particles. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.022108.
Ashhab, S., Maruyama, Koji, Laboratoire d'Information Quantique and QUIC, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Code Postal 165/59, 1050 Bruxelles, Nori, Franco, and Physics Department and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040. Thu . "Observing quantum nonlocality in the entanglement between modes of massive particles". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.022108.
@article{osti_20982067,
title = {Observing quantum nonlocality in the entanglement between modes of massive particles},
author = {Ashhab, S. and Maruyama, Koji and Laboratoire d'Information Quantique and QUIC, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Code Postal 165/59, 1050 Bruxelles and Nori, Franco and Physics Department and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040},
abstractNote = {We consider the question of whether it is possible to use the entanglement between spatially separated modes of massive particles to observe nonlocal quantum correlations. Mode entanglement can be obtained using a single particle, indicating that it requires careful consideration before concluding whether experimental observation--e.g., violation of Bell inequalities--is possible or not. In the simplest setups analogous to optics experiments, that observation is prohibited by fundamental conservation laws. However, we show that using auxiliary particles, mode entanglement can be converted into forms that allow the observation of quantum nonlocality. The probability of successful conversion depends on the nature and number of auxiliary particles used. In particular, we find that an auxiliary Bose-Einstein condensate allows the conversion arbitrarily many times with a small error that depends only on the initial state of the condensate.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.75.022108},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 2,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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