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Title: Serum resistin is associated with the severity of microangiopathies in type 2 diabetes

Abstract

Resistin, secreted from adipocytes, causes insulin resistance and diabetes in rodents. To determine the relation between serum resistin and diabetic microangiopathies in humans, we analyzed 238 Japanese T2DM subjects. Mean serum resistin was higher in subjects with either advanced retinopathy (preproliferative or proliferative) (P = 0.0130), advanced nephropathy (stage III or IV) (P = 0.0151), or neuropathy (P = 0.0013). Simple regression analysis showed that serum resistin was positively correlated with retinopathy stage (P = 0.0212), nephropathy stage (P = 0.0052), and neuropathy (P = 0.0013). Multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and BMI, revealed that serum resistin was correlated with retinopathy stage (P = 0.0144), nephropathy stage (P = 0.0111), and neuropathy (P = 0.0053). Serum resistin was positively correlated with the number of advanced microangiopathies, independent of age, gender, BMI, and either the duration of T2DM (P = 0.0318) or serum creatinine (P = 0.0092). Therefore, serum resistin was positively correlated with the severity of microangiopathies in T2DM.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Department of Molecular and Genetic Medicine, Ehime, University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan). E-mail: harosawa@m.ehime-u.ac.jp
  2. Department of Molecular and Genetic Medicine, Ehime, University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan)
  3. Ehime Prefectural Hospital, Ehime (Japan)
  4. Department of Human Genetics, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20979867
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 355; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.144; PII: S0006-291X(07)00209-4; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BLOOD SERUM; CREATININE; INSULIN; REGRESSION ANALYSIS; RODENTS

Citation Formats

Osawa, Haruhiko, Ochi, Masaaki, Kato, Kenichi, Yamauchi, Junko, Nishida, Wataru, Takata, Yasunori, Kawamura, Ryoichi, Onuma, Hiroshi, Takasuka, Tomomi, Shimizu, Ikki, Fujii, Yasuhisa, Ohashi, Jun, and Makino, Hideichi. Serum resistin is associated with the severity of microangiopathies in type 2 diabetes. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.144.
Osawa, Haruhiko, Ochi, Masaaki, Kato, Kenichi, Yamauchi, Junko, Nishida, Wataru, Takata, Yasunori, Kawamura, Ryoichi, Onuma, Hiroshi, Takasuka, Tomomi, Shimizu, Ikki, Fujii, Yasuhisa, Ohashi, Jun, & Makino, Hideichi. Serum resistin is associated with the severity of microangiopathies in type 2 diabetes. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.144.
Osawa, Haruhiko, Ochi, Masaaki, Kato, Kenichi, Yamauchi, Junko, Nishida, Wataru, Takata, Yasunori, Kawamura, Ryoichi, Onuma, Hiroshi, Takasuka, Tomomi, Shimizu, Ikki, Fujii, Yasuhisa, Ohashi, Jun, and Makino, Hideichi. Fri . "Serum resistin is associated with the severity of microangiopathies in type 2 diabetes". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.144.
@article{osti_20979867,
title = {Serum resistin is associated with the severity of microangiopathies in type 2 diabetes},
author = {Osawa, Haruhiko and Ochi, Masaaki and Kato, Kenichi and Yamauchi, Junko and Nishida, Wataru and Takata, Yasunori and Kawamura, Ryoichi and Onuma, Hiroshi and Takasuka, Tomomi and Shimizu, Ikki and Fujii, Yasuhisa and Ohashi, Jun and Makino, Hideichi},
abstractNote = {Resistin, secreted from adipocytes, causes insulin resistance and diabetes in rodents. To determine the relation between serum resistin and diabetic microangiopathies in humans, we analyzed 238 Japanese T2DM subjects. Mean serum resistin was higher in subjects with either advanced retinopathy (preproliferative or proliferative) (P = 0.0130), advanced nephropathy (stage III or IV) (P = 0.0151), or neuropathy (P = 0.0013). Simple regression analysis showed that serum resistin was positively correlated with retinopathy stage (P = 0.0212), nephropathy stage (P = 0.0052), and neuropathy (P = 0.0013). Multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and BMI, revealed that serum resistin was correlated with retinopathy stage (P = 0.0144), nephropathy stage (P = 0.0111), and neuropathy (P = 0.0053). Serum resistin was positively correlated with the number of advanced microangiopathies, independent of age, gender, BMI, and either the duration of T2DM (P = 0.0318) or serum creatinine (P = 0.0092). Therefore, serum resistin was positively correlated with the severity of microangiopathies in T2DM.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.144},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 355,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 06 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Apr 06 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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