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Title: Molecular pathways of angiogenesis inhibition

Abstract

A large body of evidence now demonstrates that angiostatic therapy represents a promising way to fight cancer. This research recently resulted in the approval of First angiostatic agent for clinical treatment of cancer. Progress has been achieved in decrypting the cellular signaling in endothelial cells induced by angiostatic agents. These agents predominantly interfere with the molecular pathways involved in migration, proliferation and endothelial cell survival. In the current review, these pathways are discussed. A thorough understanding of the mechanism of action of angiostatic agents is required to develop efficient anti-tumor therapies.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Angiogenesis Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Research Institute for Growth and Development (GROW), University of Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands)
  2. Angiogenesis Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Research Institute for Growth and Development (GROW), University of Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands). E-mail: aw.griffioen@path.unimaas.nl
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20979850
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 355; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.123; PII: S0006-291X(07)00181-7; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; APOPTOSIS; CELL PROLIFERATION; INHIBITION; NEOPLASMS; REVIEWS; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Tabruyn, Sebastien P., and Griffioen, Arjan W. Molecular pathways of angiogenesis inhibition. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.123.
Tabruyn, Sebastien P., & Griffioen, Arjan W. Molecular pathways of angiogenesis inhibition. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.123.
Tabruyn, Sebastien P., and Griffioen, Arjan W. Fri . "Molecular pathways of angiogenesis inhibition". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.123.
@article{osti_20979850,
title = {Molecular pathways of angiogenesis inhibition},
author = {Tabruyn, Sebastien P. and Griffioen, Arjan W.},
abstractNote = {A large body of evidence now demonstrates that angiostatic therapy represents a promising way to fight cancer. This research recently resulted in the approval of First angiostatic agent for clinical treatment of cancer. Progress has been achieved in decrypting the cellular signaling in endothelial cells induced by angiostatic agents. These agents predominantly interfere with the molecular pathways involved in migration, proliferation and endothelial cell survival. In the current review, these pathways are discussed. A thorough understanding of the mechanism of action of angiostatic agents is required to develop efficient anti-tumor therapies.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.01.123},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 355,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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