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Title: Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice

Abstract

Recent studies have suggested the existence of osteoblastic cells in the circulation, but the origin and role of these cells in vivo are not clear. Here, we examined how these cells contribute to osteogenesis in a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced model of ectopic bone formation. Following lethal dose-irradiation and subsequent green fluorescent protein-transgenic bone marrow cell-transplantation (GFP-BMT) in mice, a BMP-2-containing collagen pellet was implanted into muscle. Three weeks later, a significant number of GFP-positive osteoblastic cells were present in the newly generated ectopic bone. Moreover, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) from the BMP-2-implanted mouse were then shown to include osteoblast progenitor cells (OPCs) in culture. Passive transfer of the PBMNCs isolated from the BMP-2-implanted GFP-mouse to the BMP-2-implanted nude mouse led to GFP-positive osteoblast accumulation in the ectopic bone. These data provide new insight into the mechanism of ectopic bone formation involving bone marrow-derived OPCs in circulating blood.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [1]
  1. Division of Gene Therapy Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
  3. Division of Gene Therapy Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan). E-mail: tamai@gts.med.osaka-u.ac.jp
  4. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20979828
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 354; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.12.226; PII: S0006-291X(07)00006-X; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BONE MARROW; BONE MARROW CELLS; COLLAGEN; EOSIN; FLUORESCEIN; HEMATOXYLIN; IN VIVO; IRRADIATION; ISOTHIOCYANATES; LETHAL DOSES; MICE; SKELETON

Citation Formats

Otsuru, Satoru, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Tamai, Katsuto, Yamazaki, Takehiko, Yoshikawa, Hideki, and Kaneda, Yasufumi. Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.12.226.
Otsuru, Satoru, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Tamai, Katsuto, Yamazaki, Takehiko, Yoshikawa, Hideki, & Kaneda, Yasufumi. Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.12.226.
Otsuru, Satoru, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Tamai, Katsuto, Yamazaki, Takehiko, Yoshikawa, Hideki, and Kaneda, Yasufumi. Fri . "Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.12.226.
@article{osti_20979828,
title = {Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice},
author = {Otsuru, Satoru and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 and Tamai, Katsuto and Yamazaki, Takehiko and Yoshikawa, Hideki and Kaneda, Yasufumi},
abstractNote = {Recent studies have suggested the existence of osteoblastic cells in the circulation, but the origin and role of these cells in vivo are not clear. Here, we examined how these cells contribute to osteogenesis in a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced model of ectopic bone formation. Following lethal dose-irradiation and subsequent green fluorescent protein-transgenic bone marrow cell-transplantation (GFP-BMT) in mice, a BMP-2-containing collagen pellet was implanted into muscle. Three weeks later, a significant number of GFP-positive osteoblastic cells were present in the newly generated ectopic bone. Moreover, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) from the BMP-2-implanted mouse were then shown to include osteoblast progenitor cells (OPCs) in culture. Passive transfer of the PBMNCs isolated from the BMP-2-implanted GFP-mouse to the BMP-2-implanted nude mouse led to GFP-positive osteoblast accumulation in the ectopic bone. These data provide new insight into the mechanism of ectopic bone formation involving bone marrow-derived OPCs in circulating blood.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.12.226},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 354,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 09 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 09 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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