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Title: Carbon loss induced by plasma beam irradiation in porous silica films

Abstract

Plasma-induced damages of porous silica films during plasma processes were investigated by using a plasma beam irradiation apparatus. We used the porous silica films incorporated with methyl groups to achieve high hydrophobicity. The carbon (methyl group) reductions in the film as an index of the level of damages induced by Ar, He, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} plasma irradiations were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The damage due to Ar and He plasma bombardment increased with an increase in the ion dosage, although it was not strongly affected by the ion energy in the range higher than 130 eV. Furthermore, it was found that the damage near the film surface was influenced more by metastable He atoms than by metastable Ar atoms. Both O ions and O atoms caused severe damage. N atoms did not affect the decrease of carbon content but reacted with carbon to form CN bonds. H atoms decreased carbon content slightly, but the amount of decrease was saturated by the further irradiation of H atoms.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. MIRAI, Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20979402
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2740334; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ARGON; CARBON; CARBON NITRIDES; CHEMICAL BONDS; HELIUM; HYDROGEN; ION BEAMS; ION MICROPROBE ANALYSIS; MASS SPECTRA; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; NITROGEN; OXYGEN; OXYGEN IONS; PLASMA; POROUS MATERIALS; SILICA; THIN FILMS; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Kurihara, K., Ono, T., Kohmura, K., Tanaka, H., Fujii, N., Hata, N., Kikkawa, T., and MIRAI, Advanced Semiconductor Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569. Carbon loss induced by plasma beam irradiation in porous silica films. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2740334.
Kurihara, K., Ono, T., Kohmura, K., Tanaka, H., Fujii, N., Hata, N., Kikkawa, T., & MIRAI, Advanced Semiconductor Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569. Carbon loss induced by plasma beam irradiation in porous silica films. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2740334.
Kurihara, K., Ono, T., Kohmura, K., Tanaka, H., Fujii, N., Hata, N., Kikkawa, T., and MIRAI, Advanced Semiconductor Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569. Fri . "Carbon loss induced by plasma beam irradiation in porous silica films". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2740334.
@article{osti_20979402,
title = {Carbon loss induced by plasma beam irradiation in porous silica films},
author = {Kurihara, K. and Ono, T. and Kohmura, K. and Tanaka, H. and Fujii, N. and Hata, N. and Kikkawa, T. and MIRAI, Advanced Semiconductor Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569},
abstractNote = {Plasma-induced damages of porous silica films during plasma processes were investigated by using a plasma beam irradiation apparatus. We used the porous silica films incorporated with methyl groups to achieve high hydrophobicity. The carbon (methyl group) reductions in the film as an index of the level of damages induced by Ar, He, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} plasma irradiations were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The damage due to Ar and He plasma bombardment increased with an increase in the ion dosage, although it was not strongly affected by the ion energy in the range higher than 130 eV. Furthermore, it was found that the damage near the film surface was influenced more by metastable He atoms than by metastable Ar atoms. Both O ions and O atoms caused severe damage. N atoms did not affect the decrease of carbon content but reacted with carbon to form CN bonds. H atoms decreased carbon content slightly, but the amount of decrease was saturated by the further irradiation of H atoms.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2740334},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 11,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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