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Title: 1.5-nm-thick silicon oxide gate films grown at 150 deg. C using modified reactive ion beam deposition with pyrolytic-gas passivation

Abstract

Low-temperature ultrathin silicon oxide gate film growth using modified reactive ion beam deposition (RIBD) with an in situ pyrolytic-gas passivation (PGP) method is described. RIBD uses low-energy-controlled reactive and ionized species and potentializes low-temperature film growth. By combining RIBD with PGP using N{sub 2}O and NF{sub 3}, 1.5-nm-thick silicon oxide gate films with high-potential barrier height energy, 3.51 eV, and low-leakage current, less than about 10{sup -5} A/cm{sup 2} at 2 MV/cm, can be obtained at a growth temperature of 150 deg. C. From an evaluation of number densities of N, F, and O atoms near the 1.5-5.0-nm-thick RIBD-with-PGP silicon oxide films/Si(100) interfaces, it is believed that interfacial N and F atoms contribute to improve the electrical characteristics and F effectively compensates the residual inconsistent-state bonding sites after the N passivation.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. NTT Microsystem Integration Laboratories, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20979392
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, International Journal Devoted to Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1116/1.2699503; (c) 2007 American Vacuum Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATOMS; BONDING; DEPOSITION; EV RANGE 01-10; ION BEAMS; LEAKAGE CURRENT; NITROGEN FLUORIDES; NITROUS OXIDE; PASSIVATION; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON; SILICON OXIDES; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0065-0273 K; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Yamada, Hiroshi. 1.5-nm-thick silicon oxide gate films grown at 150 deg. C using modified reactive ion beam deposition with pyrolytic-gas passivation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1116/1.2699503.
Yamada, Hiroshi. 1.5-nm-thick silicon oxide gate films grown at 150 deg. C using modified reactive ion beam deposition with pyrolytic-gas passivation. United States. doi:10.1116/1.2699503.
Yamada, Hiroshi. Thu . "1.5-nm-thick silicon oxide gate films grown at 150 deg. C using modified reactive ion beam deposition with pyrolytic-gas passivation". United States. doi:10.1116/1.2699503.
@article{osti_20979392,
title = {1.5-nm-thick silicon oxide gate films grown at 150 deg. C using modified reactive ion beam deposition with pyrolytic-gas passivation},
author = {Yamada, Hiroshi},
abstractNote = {Low-temperature ultrathin silicon oxide gate film growth using modified reactive ion beam deposition (RIBD) with an in situ pyrolytic-gas passivation (PGP) method is described. RIBD uses low-energy-controlled reactive and ionized species and potentializes low-temperature film growth. By combining RIBD with PGP using N{sub 2}O and NF{sub 3}, 1.5-nm-thick silicon oxide gate films with high-potential barrier height energy, 3.51 eV, and low-leakage current, less than about 10{sup -5} A/cm{sup 2} at 2 MV/cm, can be obtained at a growth temperature of 150 deg. C. From an evaluation of number densities of N, F, and O atoms near the 1.5-5.0-nm-thick RIBD-with-PGP silicon oxide films/Si(100) interfaces, it is believed that interfacial N and F atoms contribute to improve the electrical characteristics and F effectively compensates the residual inconsistent-state bonding sites after the N passivation.},
doi = {10.1116/1.2699503},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, International Journal Devoted to Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films},
number = 2,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The reliability of 1.5-nm-thick silicon oxide gate films grown at 150 deg. C by modified reactive ion beam deposition (RIBD) with in situ pyrolytic-gas passivation (PGP) using N{sub 2}O and NF{sub 3} was investigated. RIBD uses low-energy-controlled reactive, ionized species and potentializes low-temperature film growth. Although the oxide films were grown at a low temperature of 150 deg. C, their fundamental indices of reliability, such as the time-dependent dielectric breakdown lifetime and interface state density, were almost equivalent to those of oxide films grown at 850 deg. C using a furnace. This is probably due to localized interfacial N andmore » F atoms. The number density of interfacial N atoms was about seven times larger than that for the furnace-grown oxide films, and this is a key factor for improving the reliability through the compensation of residual inconsistent-state bonding sites.« less
  • This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resultingmore » MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce D{sub it} to below 2 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.« less
  • Thick, epitaxial NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (NdBCO) films (up to 2.1 {micro}m) with a high density of nanoscale columnar defects parallel to the c-axis of the film were deposited on ion-beam assisted deposition-MgO templates via pulsed laser deposition. The columnar defects were composed of self-assembled BaZrO{sub 3} (BZO) nanodots. A significant enhancement in J{sub c} for H||c is found for these films. In addition, an overall improvement in the in-field J{sub c} at all field orientations is observed. Compared to pure NdBCO of similar thickness, the in-field Jc at H||c for 0.7 {micro}m thick NdBCO+BZO film is improved by amore » factor of 2-4 in the field range of 0.1-4 T and 10-20 at 7-8 T at 77 K. In addition, a smaller {alpha}{approx}0.17 is found in the field regime where J{sub c}{approx}H{sup -{alpha}}. Also, a higher maximum pinning force, F{sub p}{sup max}{approx}14 GN/m3, is found at 3 T and a larger H{sub irr} over 8 T is found for the NdBCO films with columnar defects.« less
  • Reactive ion beam deposition has been used to grow c-axis-oriented superconducting thin films in the Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O (BCSCO) system around the cation ratio 1:1:1:1 on single-crystal (001) MgO. The films show a single superconducting transition with an initial onset near 85 K and a critical current of 5 x 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 10 K. Two different BCSCO-containing phases have been identified in the thin films: one with a tetragonal pseudo-body-centered subcell, c = 24.4 A, which is not superconducting above 28 K, and a second with c = 30.6 A, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Electron diffraction measurementsmore » on the 30.6 A phase are consistent with those previously reported for the bulk ceramic.« less