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Title: Voltage oxide removal for plating: A new method of electroplating oxide coated metals in situ

Abstract

A novel in situ method for electroplating oxide coated metals is described. Termed VORP, for voltage oxide removal for plating, the process utilizes a voltage pulse {approx}20-200 V, {approx}2 ms in duration, applied between working and counterelectrodes while both are immersed in a copper electrolyte. The pulse is almost immediately followed by galvanostatic plate-up. Adherent copper deposits up to {approx}4 {mu}m in height on stainless steel 316 coupons have been obtained. Temperature testing up to 260 deg. C in air does not affect the copper adhesion. A preliminary model for oxide removal is proposed utilizing concepts of dielectric breakdown.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20979390
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, International Journal Devoted to Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1116/1.2539356; (c) 2007 American Vacuum Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BREAKDOWN; COPPER; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTROLYTES; ELECTROPLATING; OXIDES; REMOVAL; STAINLESS STEEL-316

Citation Formats

Gutfeld, R. J. von, and West, A. C. Voltage oxide removal for plating: A new method of electroplating oxide coated metals in situ. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1116/1.2539356.
Gutfeld, R. J. von, & West, A. C. Voltage oxide removal for plating: A new method of electroplating oxide coated metals in situ. United States. doi:10.1116/1.2539356.
Gutfeld, R. J. von, and West, A. C. Thu . "Voltage oxide removal for plating: A new method of electroplating oxide coated metals in situ". United States. doi:10.1116/1.2539356.
@article{osti_20979390,
title = {Voltage oxide removal for plating: A new method of electroplating oxide coated metals in situ},
author = {Gutfeld, R. J. von and West, A. C.},
abstractNote = {A novel in situ method for electroplating oxide coated metals is described. Termed VORP, for voltage oxide removal for plating, the process utilizes a voltage pulse {approx}20-200 V, {approx}2 ms in duration, applied between working and counterelectrodes while both are immersed in a copper electrolyte. The pulse is almost immediately followed by galvanostatic plate-up. Adherent copper deposits up to {approx}4 {mu}m in height on stainless steel 316 coupons have been obtained. Temperature testing up to 260 deg. C in air does not affect the copper adhesion. A preliminary model for oxide removal is proposed utilizing concepts of dielectric breakdown.},
doi = {10.1116/1.2539356},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, International Journal Devoted to Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films},
number = 2,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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