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Title: Labeling HIV-1 virions with two fluorescent proteins allows identification of virions that have productively entered the target cell

Abstract

GFP-Vpr labeled HIV-1 virions have provided a method to visually examine the interactions between the virus and target cell during infection. However, existing methods to discriminate between virions that have been non-specifically endocytosed from those that have productively entered the host cell cytoplasm have remained problematic. Therefore, we examined the ability of a series of membrane-targeted fluorescent fusion protein constructs to be incorporated into virions. We find that a fluorescent protein fusion targeted to the plasma membrane by the addition of the N-terminal 15 amino acid sequence of c-Src (S15) is efficiently packaged into HIV virions. Using fluorescent proteins fused to this sequence, we have generated virions dually labeled with S15-mCherry and GFP-Vpr. Importantly, we can detect the loss of this S15-mCherry membrane signal following fusion. After infection with VSV-g pseudotyped HIV virions, we find a measurable, specific loss of membrane label during infection. This loss of fluorescence is not observed when fusion is prevented using bafilomycin A. This increased ability to discriminate between non-productively endocytosed virions and those actively undergoing steps in the infectious process will facilitate efforts to examine early steps in infection microscopically.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Ward 8-140, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)
  2. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)
  3. Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Ward 8-140, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States). E-mail: thope@northwestern.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20977008
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Virology; Journal Volume: 360; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2006.10.025; PII: S0042-6822(06)00735-5; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AIDS VIRUS; AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; CELL MEMBRANES; CYTOPLASM; FLUORESCENCE; LABELLING; MICROSCOPY; PROTEINS

Citation Formats

Campbell, Edward M., Perez, Omar, Melar, Marta, and Hope, Thomas J. Labeling HIV-1 virions with two fluorescent proteins allows identification of virions that have productively entered the target cell. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.10.025.
Campbell, Edward M., Perez, Omar, Melar, Marta, & Hope, Thomas J. Labeling HIV-1 virions with two fluorescent proteins allows identification of virions that have productively entered the target cell. United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.10.025.
Campbell, Edward M., Perez, Omar, Melar, Marta, and Hope, Thomas J. Tue . "Labeling HIV-1 virions with two fluorescent proteins allows identification of virions that have productively entered the target cell". United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.10.025.
@article{osti_20977008,
title = {Labeling HIV-1 virions with two fluorescent proteins allows identification of virions that have productively entered the target cell},
author = {Campbell, Edward M. and Perez, Omar and Melar, Marta and Hope, Thomas J.},
abstractNote = {GFP-Vpr labeled HIV-1 virions have provided a method to visually examine the interactions between the virus and target cell during infection. However, existing methods to discriminate between virions that have been non-specifically endocytosed from those that have productively entered the host cell cytoplasm have remained problematic. Therefore, we examined the ability of a series of membrane-targeted fluorescent fusion protein constructs to be incorporated into virions. We find that a fluorescent protein fusion targeted to the plasma membrane by the addition of the N-terminal 15 amino acid sequence of c-Src (S15) is efficiently packaged into HIV virions. Using fluorescent proteins fused to this sequence, we have generated virions dually labeled with S15-mCherry and GFP-Vpr. Importantly, we can detect the loss of this S15-mCherry membrane signal following fusion. After infection with VSV-g pseudotyped HIV virions, we find a measurable, specific loss of membrane label during infection. This loss of fluorescence is not observed when fusion is prevented using bafilomycin A. This increased ability to discriminate between non-productively endocytosed virions and those actively undergoing steps in the infectious process will facilitate efforts to examine early steps in infection microscopically.},
doi = {10.1016/j.virol.2006.10.025},
journal = {Virology},
number = 2,
volume = 360,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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