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Title: Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a target for cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for hematopoiesis, self-renewal and differentiation potential

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in bone marrow (BM) regulate the differentiation and proliferation of adjacent hematopoietic precursor cells and contribute to the regeneration of mesenchymal tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat and connective tissue. BM is an important site for the pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) where the virus establishes latency in hematopoietic progenitors and can transmit after reactivation to neighboring cells. Here we demonstrate that BM-MSCs are permissive to productive HCMV infection, and that HCMV alters the function of MSCs: (i) by changing the repertoire of cell surface molecules in BM-MSCs, HCMV modifies the pattern of interaction between BM-MSCs and hematopoietic cells; (ii) HCMV infection of BM-MSCs undergoing adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation impaired the process of differentiation. Our results suggest that by altering BM-MSC biology, HCMV may contribute to the development of various diseases.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States)
  2. Laboratory of Mycobacterial Immunity and Pathogenesis, Public Health Research Institute, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States)
  3. Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States)
  4. Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States)
  5. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States). E-mail: kotenkse@umdnj.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20977000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Virology; Journal Volume: 360; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2006.09.017; PII: S0042-6822(06)00670-2; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BLOOD FORMATION; BONE MARROW; CARTILAGE; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; PATHOGENESIS; REGENERATION; SKELETON; STEM CELLS; VIRUSES

Citation Formats

Smirnov, Sergey V., Harbacheuski, Ryhor, Lewis-Antes, Anita, Zhu Hua, Rameshwar, Pranela, and Kotenko, Sergei V.. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a target for cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for hematopoiesis, self-renewal and differentiation potential. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.09.017.
Smirnov, Sergey V., Harbacheuski, Ryhor, Lewis-Antes, Anita, Zhu Hua, Rameshwar, Pranela, & Kotenko, Sergei V.. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a target for cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for hematopoiesis, self-renewal and differentiation potential. United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.09.017.
Smirnov, Sergey V., Harbacheuski, Ryhor, Lewis-Antes, Anita, Zhu Hua, Rameshwar, Pranela, and Kotenko, Sergei V.. Fri . "Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a target for cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for hematopoiesis, self-renewal and differentiation potential". United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.09.017.
@article{osti_20977000,
title = {Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a target for cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for hematopoiesis, self-renewal and differentiation potential},
author = {Smirnov, Sergey V. and Harbacheuski, Ryhor and Lewis-Antes, Anita and Zhu Hua and Rameshwar, Pranela and Kotenko, Sergei V.},
abstractNote = {Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in bone marrow (BM) regulate the differentiation and proliferation of adjacent hematopoietic precursor cells and contribute to the regeneration of mesenchymal tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat and connective tissue. BM is an important site for the pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) where the virus establishes latency in hematopoietic progenitors and can transmit after reactivation to neighboring cells. Here we demonstrate that BM-MSCs are permissive to productive HCMV infection, and that HCMV alters the function of MSCs: (i) by changing the repertoire of cell surface molecules in BM-MSCs, HCMV modifies the pattern of interaction between BM-MSCs and hematopoietic cells; (ii) HCMV infection of BM-MSCs undergoing adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation impaired the process of differentiation. Our results suggest that by altering BM-MSC biology, HCMV may contribute to the development of various diseases.},
doi = {10.1016/j.virol.2006.09.017},
journal = {Virology},
number = 1,
volume = 360,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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