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Title: Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity

Abstract

The present review is based on presentations from the meeting of the Society of Toxicology in San Diego, CA (March 2006). It addresses recent developments in the understanding of the transport of manganese (Mn) into the central nervous system (CNS), as well as brain imaging and neurocognitive studies in non-human primates aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity. Finally, we discuss potential therapeutic modalities for treating Mn intoxication in humans.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Departments of Pediatrics, Pharmacology, and Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, B-3307 Medical Center North, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232-2495 (United States). E-mail: Michael.Aschner@vanderbilt.edu
  2. Neurotoxicology and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)
  3. Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
  4. School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976942
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 221; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2007.03.001; PII: S0041-008X(07)00106-8; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRAIN; HUMAN POPULATIONS; MANGANESE; MEETINGS; NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PRIMATES; REVIEWS; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Aschner, Michael, Guilarte, Tomas R., Schneider, Jay S., and Zheng Wei. Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2007.03.001.
Aschner, Michael, Guilarte, Tomas R., Schneider, Jay S., & Zheng Wei. Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2007.03.001.
Aschner, Michael, Guilarte, Tomas R., Schneider, Jay S., and Zheng Wei. Fri . "Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2007.03.001.
@article{osti_20976942,
title = {Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity},
author = {Aschner, Michael and Guilarte, Tomas R. and Schneider, Jay S. and Zheng Wei},
abstractNote = {The present review is based on presentations from the meeting of the Society of Toxicology in San Diego, CA (March 2006). It addresses recent developments in the understanding of the transport of manganese (Mn) into the central nervous system (CNS), as well as brain imaging and neurocognitive studies in non-human primates aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity. Finally, we discuss potential therapeutic modalities for treating Mn intoxication in humans.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2007.03.001},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 2,
volume = 221,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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