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Title: Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?

Abstract

Glucose feeding can markedly exacerbate the toxicity of the anticholinesterase insecticide, parathion. We determined the effects of parathion on brain nitric oxide and its possible role in potentiation of toxicity by glucose feeding. Adult rats were given water or 15% glucose in water for 3 days and challenged with vehicle or parathion (18 mg/kg, s.c.) on day 4. Functional signs, plasma glucose and brain cholinesterase, citrulline (an indicator of nitric oxide production) and high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were measured 1-3 days after parathion. Glucose feeding exacerbated cholinergic toxicity. Parathion increased plasma glucose (15-33%) and decreased cortical cholinesterase activity (81-90%), with no significant differences between water and glucose treatment groups. In contrast, parathion increased brain regional citrulline (40-47%) and decreased HEPs (18-40%) in rats drinking water, with significantly greater changes in glucose-fed rats (248-363% increase and 31-61% decrease, respectively). We then studied the effects of inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by 7-nitroindazole (7NI, 30 mg/kg, i.p. x4) on parathion toxicity and its modulation by glucose feeding. Co-exposure to parathion and 7NI led to a marked increase in cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality, regardless of glucose intake. Thus, glucose feeding enhanced the accumulation of brain nitric oxide following parathion exposure, butmore » inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis was ineffective at counteracting increased parathion toxicity associated with glucose feeding. Evidence is therefore presented to suggest that nitric oxide may play both toxic and protective roles in cholinergic toxicity, and its precise contribution to modulation by glucose feeding requires further investigation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, 264 McElroy Hall, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States). E-mail: jing.pope@okstate.edu
  2. Breathitt Veterinary Center, Murray State University, Hopkinsville, KY 42241 (United States)
  3. Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, 264 McElroy Hall, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976874
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 219; Journal Issue: 2-3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2006.11.005; PII: S0041-008X(06)00419-4; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOSYNTHESIS; BRAIN; CHOLINESTERASE; CITRULLINE; DRINKING WATER; FEEDING; GLUCOSE; INTAKE; MODULATION; NITRIC OXIDE; PARATHION; PHOSPHATES; RATS; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Liu Jing, Gupta, Ramesh C., Goad, John T., Karanth, Subramanya, and Pope, Carey. Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Liu Jing, Gupta, Ramesh C., Goad, John T., Karanth, Subramanya, & Pope, Carey. Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?. United States.
Liu Jing, Gupta, Ramesh C., Goad, John T., Karanth, Subramanya, and Pope, Carey. Thu . "Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20976874,
title = {Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?},
author = {Liu Jing and Gupta, Ramesh C. and Goad, John T. and Karanth, Subramanya and Pope, Carey},
abstractNote = {Glucose feeding can markedly exacerbate the toxicity of the anticholinesterase insecticide, parathion. We determined the effects of parathion on brain nitric oxide and its possible role in potentiation of toxicity by glucose feeding. Adult rats were given water or 15% glucose in water for 3 days and challenged with vehicle or parathion (18 mg/kg, s.c.) on day 4. Functional signs, plasma glucose and brain cholinesterase, citrulline (an indicator of nitric oxide production) and high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were measured 1-3 days after parathion. Glucose feeding exacerbated cholinergic toxicity. Parathion increased plasma glucose (15-33%) and decreased cortical cholinesterase activity (81-90%), with no significant differences between water and glucose treatment groups. In contrast, parathion increased brain regional citrulline (40-47%) and decreased HEPs (18-40%) in rats drinking water, with significantly greater changes in glucose-fed rats (248-363% increase and 31-61% decrease, respectively). We then studied the effects of inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by 7-nitroindazole (7NI, 30 mg/kg, i.p. x4) on parathion toxicity and its modulation by glucose feeding. Co-exposure to parathion and 7NI led to a marked increase in cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality, regardless of glucose intake. Thus, glucose feeding enhanced the accumulation of brain nitric oxide following parathion exposure, but inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis was ineffective at counteracting increased parathion toxicity associated with glucose feeding. Evidence is therefore presented to suggest that nitric oxide may play both toxic and protective roles in cholinergic toxicity, and its precise contribution to modulation by glucose feeding requires further investigation.},
doi = {},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 2-3,
volume = 219,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) play an important role in alcohol-induced liver injury. AA promotes toxicity in rat hepatocytes with high levels of cytochrome P4502E1 and in HepG2 E47 cells which express CYP2E1. Nitric oxide (NO) participates in the regulation of various cell activities as well as in cytotoxic events. NO may act as a protectant against cytotoxic stress or may enhance cytotoxicity when produced at elevated concentrations. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effect of endogenously or exogenously produced NO on AA toxicity in liver cells with high expression of CYP2E1 andmore » assess possible mechanisms for its actions. Pyrazole-induced rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells expressing CYP2E1 were treated with AA in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase L-N {sup G}-Nitroarginine Methylester (L-NAME) or the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), and (Z)-1-[-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-aminoethyl)]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA-NONO). AA decreased cell viability from 100% to 48 {+-} 6% after treatment for 48 h. In the presence of L-NAME, viability was further lowered to 23 {+-} 5%, while, SNAP or DETA-NONO increased viability to 66 {+-} 8 or 71 {+-} 6%. The L-NAME potentiated toxicity was primarily necrotic in nature. L-NAME did not affect CYP2E1 activity or CYP2E1 content. SNAP significantly lowered CYP2E1 activity but not protein. AA treatment increased lipid peroxidation and lowered GSH levels. L-NAME potentiated while SNAP prevented these changes. Thus, L-NAME increased, while NO donors decreased AA-induced oxidative stress. Antioxidants prevented the L-NAME potentiation of AA toxicity. Damage to mitochondria by AA was shown by a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). L-NAME potentiated this decline in MMP in association with its increase in AA-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. NO donors decreased this decline in MMP in association with their decrease in AA-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. These results indicate that NO can be hepatoprotective against CYP2E1-dependent toxicity, preventing AA-induced oxidative stress.« less
  • We previously reported that sequence of exposure to chlorpyrifos and parathion in adult rats can markedly influence toxic outcome. In the present study, we evaluated the interactive toxicity of chlorpyrifos (8 mg/kg, po) and parathion (0.5 mg/kg, po) in neonatal (7 days old) rats. Rats were exposed to the insecticides either concurrently or sequentially (separated by 4 h) and sacrificed at 4, 8, and 24 h after the first exposure for biochemical measurements (cholinesterase activity in brain, plasma, and diaphragm and carboxylesterase activity in plasma and liver). The concurrently-exposed group showed more cumulative lethality (15/24) than either of the sequentialmore » dosing groups. With sequential dosing, rats treated initially with chlorpyrifos prior to parathion (C/P) exhibited higher lethality (7/23) compared to those treated with parathion before chlorpyrifos (P/C; 1/24). At 8 h after initial dosing, brain cholinesterase inhibition was significantly greater in the C/P group (59%) compared to the P/C group (28%). Diaphragm and plasma cholinesterase activity also followed a relatively similar pattern of inhibition. Carboxylesterase inhibition in plasma and liver was relatively similar among the treatment groups across time-points. Similar sequence-dependent differences in brain cholinesterase inhibition were also noted with lower binary exposures to chlorpyrifos (2 mg/kg) and parathion (0.35 mg/kg). In vitro and ex vivo studies compared relative oxon detoxification of carboxylesterases (calcium-insensitive) and A-esterases (calcium-sensitive) in liver homogenates from untreated and insecticide pretreated rats. Using tissues from untreated rats, carboxylesterases detoxified both chlorpyrifos oxon and paraoxon, while A-esterases only detoxified chlorpyrifos oxon. With parathion pretreatment, A-esterases still detoxified chlorpyrifos oxon while liver from chlorpyrifos pretreated rats had little apparent effect on paraoxon. We conclude that while neonatal rats are less capable than adults at detoxifying many organophosphorus insecticides including chlorpyrifos and parathion, toxicant-selective differences in detoxification play a role in sequence-dependent toxicity in both neonatal and adult rats with these two insecticides.« less
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