skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk in subjects living in arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in southwestern Taiwan

Abstract

Background: Cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE) from drinking water has been shown to be associated with hypertension in a dose-response pattern. This study further explored the association between arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk among residents of arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in Taiwan considering the effect of CAE and other potential confounders. Method: There were 871 subjects (488 women and 383 men) and among them 372 were diagnosed as having hypertension based on a positive history or measured systolic blood pressure {>=} 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure {>=} 90 mm Hg. Urinary arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Primary arsenic methylation index [PMI, defined as monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) divided by (As{sup III} + As{sup V})] and secondary arsenic methylation index (SMI, defined as dimethylarsinic acid divided by MMA{sup V}) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capability. Results: The level of urinary arsenic was still significantly correlated with cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE) calculated from a questionnaire interview (p = 0.02) even after the residents stopped drinking the artesian well water for 2-3 decades. Hypertensive subjects had higher percentages of MMA{sup V} and lower SMI than subjects without hypertension. However, subjects having CAE >more » 0 mg/L-year had higher hypertension risk than those who had CAE = 0 mg/L-year disregard a high or low methylation index. Conclusion: Inefficient arsenic methylation ability may be related with hypertension risk.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [3];  [7]
  1. Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)
  2. National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)
  3. (China)
  4. Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)
  5. Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)
  6. Genomic Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)
  7. Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China). E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976847
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 218; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.022; PII: S0041-008X(06)00365-6; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ARSENIC; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; BLOOD PRESSURE; DRINKING WATER; HEALTH HAZARDS; HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY; HYDRIDES; HYPERTENSION; METHYLATION; MITES; TAIWAN

Citation Formats

Huang, Y.-K., Tseng, C.-H., Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Department of Medical Research and Development, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan, Huang, Y.-L., Yang, M.-H., Chen, C.-J., Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan, and Hsueh, Y.-M. Arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk in subjects living in arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in southwestern Taiwan. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.022.
Huang, Y.-K., Tseng, C.-H., Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Department of Medical Research and Development, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan, Huang, Y.-L., Yang, M.-H., Chen, C.-J., Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan, & Hsueh, Y.-M. Arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk in subjects living in arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in southwestern Taiwan. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.022.
Huang, Y.-K., Tseng, C.-H., Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Department of Medical Research and Development, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan, Huang, Y.-L., Yang, M.-H., Chen, C.-J., Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan, and Hsueh, Y.-M. Mon . "Arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk in subjects living in arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in southwestern Taiwan". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.022.
@article{osti_20976847,
title = {Arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk in subjects living in arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in southwestern Taiwan},
author = {Huang, Y.-K. and Tseng, C.-H. and Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan and Department of Medical Research and Development, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan and Huang, Y.-L. and Yang, M.-H. and Chen, C.-J. and Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan and Hsueh, Y.-M.},
abstractNote = {Background: Cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE) from drinking water has been shown to be associated with hypertension in a dose-response pattern. This study further explored the association between arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk among residents of arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in Taiwan considering the effect of CAE and other potential confounders. Method: There were 871 subjects (488 women and 383 men) and among them 372 were diagnosed as having hypertension based on a positive history or measured systolic blood pressure {>=} 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure {>=} 90 mm Hg. Urinary arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Primary arsenic methylation index [PMI, defined as monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) divided by (As{sup III} + As{sup V})] and secondary arsenic methylation index (SMI, defined as dimethylarsinic acid divided by MMA{sup V}) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capability. Results: The level of urinary arsenic was still significantly correlated with cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE) calculated from a questionnaire interview (p = 0.02) even after the residents stopped drinking the artesian well water for 2-3 decades. Hypertensive subjects had higher percentages of MMA{sup V} and lower SMI than subjects without hypertension. However, subjects having CAE > 0 mg/L-year had higher hypertension risk than those who had CAE = 0 mg/L-year disregard a high or low methylation index. Conclusion: Inefficient arsenic methylation ability may be related with hypertension risk.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.022},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 2,
volume = 218,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan weremore » recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ► We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ► LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ► Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.« less
  • To understand whether human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) would modulate the risk for arsenic-related atherosclerosis, we studied 196 residents from an arseniasis-endemic area in Southwestern Taiwan and 291 age- and sex-matched residents from a nearby control area where arsenic exposure was found low. Carotid atherosclerosis was defined by a carotid artery intima-media wall thickness (IMT) of > 1.0 mm. Prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis was increased in the arseniasis-endemic area as compared to the control area after adjustment for conventional risk factors (OR = 2.20, p < 0.01). The prevalence was positively associated with cumulative arsenic exposure (mg/L-year) in a dose-dependent manner.more » Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that in the endemic group, low serum PON1 activity was an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis (OR = 4.18 low vs. high, p < 0.05). For those of low PON1 activity and high cumulative arsenic exposure, the odds ratio for the prevalence of atherosclerosis was further increased up to 5.68 (p < 0.05). No significant association was found between atherosclerosis and four polymorphisms of the PON gene cluster (PON1 - 108C/T, PON1 Q192R, PON2 A148G, PON2 C311S). However, genetic frequencies of certain alleles including PON1 Q192, PON2 G148 and PON2 C311 were found increased in the endemic group as compared to the controls and a general Chinese population, indicating a possible survival selection in the endemic group after a long arsenic exposure history. Our results showed a significant joint effect between arsenic exposure and serum PON1 activity on carotid atherosclerosis, suggesting that subjects of low PON1 activity may be more susceptible to arsenic-related cardiovascular disease.« less
  • A hospital-based case-control study was conducted near a former black-foot disease (BFD)-endemic area in southwestern Taiwan to examine the possible risk factors and genetic susceptibility for urinary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). A total of 221 patients with pathologically confirmed TCC and 223 age-sex-matched control subjects from urology outpatient clinics were recruited between 1998 and 2002. The results showed that residency in the BFD area and consumption of well water for more than 10 years was a strong factor on urinary cancer risk (odds ratio [OR],8.16, 95% confidence interval [CI],3.34-19.90, p < 0.0001). Dose response relationship between average arsenic concentration inmore » well water and TCC risk was also observed. Cigarette smoking played a relatively minor role in urinary carcinogenesis in this study. The GSTP1 Ile105Val A {yields} G polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer risk (A/G + G/G: OR = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.39-0.94, p = 0.02), and the effect of Val105 allele was largely confined to the subjects diagnosed earlier than 55 years old (A/G + G/G: OR,0.29; 95% CI, 0.09-0.87, p = 0.03). The results suggest that GSTP1 is a candidate for susceptibility locus and Ile105 allele may predispose individuals to early-onset urinary TCC. The GSTM1 null genotype was associated with tumors of high-invasiveness (OR,2.21; 95% CI, 1.34-4.73) as well as with early-onset TCC risk (OR,2.53; 95% CI, 0.97-6.59). Our preliminary results showed the XRCC1 Arg194Trp were associated with arsenic-related urinary TCC and the interaction between the genotype and the exposure was statistically significant. The modulating effect of the GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, EPHX Tyr113His and XRCC1 Arg280His on arsenic-related TCC risk was also suggestive. These observations implied that impaired metabolism of carcinogenic exposure as well as impaired DNA repair function play an important role in arsenic-related urinary transitional cell carcinogenesis.« less
  • Chronic arsenic exposure has been documented to be associated with various cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate 1) the increased risk of QT prolongation in chronic arsenic exposure, and 2) the relationships of cardiac repolarization (QT interval duration) with ischemic heart disease and carotid atherosclerosis. We studied 280 men and 355 women living in the endemic area of arseniasis in southwestern Taiwan. QT intervals in electrocardiogram and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) by ultrasonography were measured. Ischemic heart disease was diagnosed by history or abnormal electrocardiogram. Significant associations of the corrected QT interval (QTc) duration with ischemic heart disease and carotidmore » intima-medium thickness and plaque were observed after adjustment for various risk factors in the multiple linear regression analysis (all p values < 0.05). Three indices of chronic arsenic exposure were all significantly associated with the risk of QTc prolongation showing dose-response relationships (p < 0.001). Chronic arsenic exposure was dose-dependently associated with the risk of QTc prolongation. Ischemic heart disease and carotid atherosclerosis were significantly associated with QTc intervals in chronic arsenic exposure. QTc prolongation might be suggested as an early biomarker for ischemic heart disease or carotid atherosclerosis in population with previous exposure to arsenic.« less
  • Few studies investigated the association between chronic arsenic exposure and the mortality of cancers by estimating individual urinary arsenic methylation profiles. Therefore, we compared with the general population in Taiwan to calculate the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) in arseniasis-endemic area of Taiwan from 1996 to 2010 and evaluated the dose-response relationships between environmental arsenic exposure indices or urinary arsenic profiles and the mortality of cause-specific cancer. A cohort of 1563 residents was conducted and collected their urine sample and information regarding arsenic exposure from a questionnaire. All-cause death was identified using the National Death Registry of Taiwan. Urinary arsenic profilesmore » were measured using high performance liquid chromatography–hydride generator–atomic absorption spectrometry. We used Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate the mortality risks. In results, 193 all-site cancer deaths, and 29, 71, 43 deaths respectively for liver, lung and bladder cancers were ascertained. The SMRs were significantly high in arseniasis-endemic areas for liver, lung, and bladder cancers. People with high urinary InAs% or low DMA% or low secondary methylation index (SMI) were the most likely to suffer bladder cancer after adjusting other risk factors. Even stopping exposure to arsenic from the artesian well water, the mortality rates of the residents were higher than general population. Finally, urinary InAs%, DMA% and SMI could be the potential biomarkers to predict the mortality risk of bladder cancer. -- Highlights: ► The SMRs were significantly high in arseniasis-endemic areas for liver, lung, and bladder cancers. ► People with high urinary InAs% were the most likely to suffer bladder cancer. ► People with low DMA% or low SMI were the most likely to suffer bladder cancer.« less