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Title: Biomarkers to monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis

Abstract

Di-docosahexaenoyl (C22:6)-bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (BMP) was identified as a promising phospholipidosis (PL) biomarker in rats treated with either amiodarone, gentamicin, or azithromycin. Sprague-Dawley rats received either amiodarone (150 mg/kg), gentamicin (100 mg/kg) or azithromycin (30 mg/kg) once daily for ten consecutive days. Histopathological examination of tissues by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated different degrees of accumulation of phospholipidosis in liver, lung, mesenteric lymph node, and kidney of drug-treated rats but not controls. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to identify levels of endogenous biochemical profiles in rat urine. Urinary levels of di-docosahexaenoyl (C22:6)-bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (BMP) correlated with induction of phospholipidosis for amiodarone, gentamicin and azithromycin. Rats treated with gentamicin also had increased urinary levels of several phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) species.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Nextcea, Inc., 3 Goffe Road, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)
  2. Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)
  3. Drug Safety and Disposition, Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 75 Sidney Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)
  4. Nextcea, Inc., 3 Goffe Road, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States). E-mail: frank.hsieh@nextcea.com
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976840
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 218; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.015; PII: S0041-008X(06)00377-2; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; DRUGS; KIDNEYS; LECITHINS; LIQUID COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY; LIVER; LUNGS; LYMPH NODES; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; PHOSPHATES; RATS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; URINE

Citation Formats

Baronas, Elizabeth Tengstrand, Lee, Ju-Whei, Alden, Carl, and Hsieh, Frank Y. Biomarkers to monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.015.
Baronas, Elizabeth Tengstrand, Lee, Ju-Whei, Alden, Carl, & Hsieh, Frank Y. Biomarkers to monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.015.
Baronas, Elizabeth Tengstrand, Lee, Ju-Whei, Alden, Carl, and Hsieh, Frank Y. Mon . "Biomarkers to monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.015.
@article{osti_20976840,
title = {Biomarkers to monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis},
author = {Baronas, Elizabeth Tengstrand and Lee, Ju-Whei and Alden, Carl and Hsieh, Frank Y.},
abstractNote = {Di-docosahexaenoyl (C22:6)-bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (BMP) was identified as a promising phospholipidosis (PL) biomarker in rats treated with either amiodarone, gentamicin, or azithromycin. Sprague-Dawley rats received either amiodarone (150 mg/kg), gentamicin (100 mg/kg) or azithromycin (30 mg/kg) once daily for ten consecutive days. Histopathological examination of tissues by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated different degrees of accumulation of phospholipidosis in liver, lung, mesenteric lymph node, and kidney of drug-treated rats but not controls. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to identify levels of endogenous biochemical profiles in rat urine. Urinary levels of di-docosahexaenoyl (C22:6)-bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (BMP) correlated with induction of phospholipidosis for amiodarone, gentamicin and azithromycin. Rats treated with gentamicin also had increased urinary levels of several phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) species.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.015},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 1,
volume = 218,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that leadmore » to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL shares morphologic/mechanistic similarities with Niemann–Pick type C disease. • Di-22:6-BMP is an effective DIPL biomarker in humans via NPC patient validation.« less
  • Drug-induced phopholipidosis in rats treated with chlorphentermine (CP) for 4-7 days suppressed totally alveolar pulmonary clearance in the first days after a TiO/sub 2/ aerosol exposure. Reversing phospholipidosis by treatment interruption led to a recovery of particle clearance. Morphological observations indicated that ''foam cells'' contained less TiO/sub 2/ particles than alveolar macrophages (AM) of control rats. Clearance of ZnO particles which seems not to be mediated by AM was not affected by CP treatment. A grand average retention curve based on data from control groups of past experiments suggests that alveolar clearance of TiO/sub 2/ particles has a phase 1more » (T/sub 1///sub 2/ = 7 days) lasting about 2 weeks and a phase 2 (T/sub 1///sub 2/ = 69 days). The results with drug-induced phospholipidosis suggest that phase 1 is pratically totally AM-mediated. Drug-induced phospholipidosis is a promising method for the study of AM involvement in defensive functions.« less
  • Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the constructionmore » and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥ 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL.« less
  • Hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity are two major reasons that drugs are withdrawn post-market, and hence it is of major concern to both the FDA and pharmaceutical companies. The number of cases of serious adverse effects (SAEs) in marketed drugs has climbed faster than the number of total drug prescriptions issued. In some cases, preclinical animal studies fail to identify the potential toxicity of a new chemical entity (NCE) under development. The current clinical chemistry biomarkers of liver and kidney injury are inadequate in terms of sensitivity and/or specificity, prompting the need to discover new translational specific biomarkers of organ injury. Metabolomicsmore » along with genomics and proteomics technologies have the capability of providing translational diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers specific for early stages of liver and kidney injury. Metabolomics has several advantages over the other omics platforms such as ease of sample preparation, data acquisition and use of biofluids collected through minimally invasive procedures in preclinical and clinical studies. The metabolomics platform is reviewed with particular emphasis on applications involving drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Analytical platforms for metabolomics, chemometrics for mining metabolomics data and the applications of the metabolomics technologies are covered in detail with emphasis on recent work in the field.« less
  • Biomarkers are biometric measurements that provide critical quantitative information about the biological condition of the animal or individual being tested. In drug safety studies, established toxicity biomarkers are used along with other conventional study data to determine dose-limiting organ toxicity, and to define species sensitivity for new chemical entities intended for possible use as human medicines. A continuing goal of drug safety scientists in the pharmaceutical industry is to discover and develop better trans-species biomarkers that can be used to determine target organ toxicities for preclinical species in short-term studies at dose levels that are some multiple of the intendedmore » human dose and again later in full development for monitoring clinical trials at lower therapeutic doses. Of particular value are early, predictive, noninvasive biomarkers that have in vitro, in vivo, and clinical transferability. Such translational biomarkers bridge animal testing used in preclinical science and human studies that are part of subsequent clinical testing. Although suitable for in vivo preclinical regulatory studies, conventional hepatic safety biomarkers are basically confirmatory markers because they signal organ toxicity after some pathological damage has occurred, and are therefore not well-suited for short-term, predictive screening assays early in the discovery-to-development progression of new chemical entities (NCEs) available in limited quantities. Efforts between regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry are underway for the coordinated discovery, qualification, verification and validation of early predictive toxicity biomarkers. Early predictive safety biomarkers are those that are detectable and quantifiable prior to the onset of irreversible tissue injury and which are associated with a mechanism of action relevant to a specific type of potential hepatic injury. Potential drug toxicity biomarkers are typically endogenous macromolecules in biological fluids with varying immunoreactivity which can present bioanalytical challenges when first discovered. The potential success of these efforts is greatly enhanced by recent advances in two closely linked technologies, toxicoproteomics and targeted, quantitative mass spectrometry. This review focuses on the examination of the current status of these technologies as they relate to the discovery and development of novel preclinical biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. A critical assessment of the current literature reveals two distinct lines of safety biomarker investigation, (1) peripheral fluid biomarkers of organ toxicity and (2) tissue or cell-based toxicity signatures. Improved peripheral fluid biomarkers should allow the sensitive detection of potential organ toxicity prior to the onset of overt organ pathology. Advancements in tissue or cell-based toxicity biomarkers will provide sensitive in vitro or ex vivo screening systems based on toxicity pathway markers. An examination of the current practices in clinical pathology and the critical evaluation of some recently proposed biomarker candidates in comparison to the desired characteristics of an ideal toxicity biomarker lead this author to conclude that a combination of selected biomarkers will be more informative if not predictive of potential animal organ toxicity than any single biomarker, new or old. For the practical assessment of combinations of conventional and/or novel toxicity biomarkers in rodent and large animal preclinical species, mass spectrometry has emerged as the premier analytical tool compared to specific immunoassays or functional assays. Selected and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry applications make it possible for this same basic technology to be used in the progressive stages of biomarker discovery, development, and more importantly, routine study applications without the use of specific antibody reagents. This technology combined with other 'omics' technologies can provide added selectivity and sensitivity in preclinical drug safety testing.« less