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Title: Application of metabonomics on an experimental model of fibrosis and cirrhosis induced by thioacetamide in rats

Abstract

Metabonomics has already been used to discriminate different pathological states in biological fields. The metabolic profiles of chronic experimental fibrosis and cirrhosis induction in rats were investigated using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy of liver extracts and serum combined with pattern recognition techniques. Rats were continuously administered with thioacetamide (TAA) in the drinking water (300 mg TAA/L), and sacrificed on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd month of treatment. {sup 1}H NMR spectra of aqueous and lipid liver extracts, together with serum were subjected to Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Liver portions were also subjected to histopathological examination and biochemical determination of malondialdehyde (MDA). Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis were progressively induced in TAA-treated rats, verified by the histopathological examination and the alterations of MDA levels. TAA administration revealed a number of changes in the {sup 1}H NMR spectra compared to control samples. The performance of PCA in liver extracts and serum, discriminated the control samples from the fibrotic and cirrhotic ones. Metabolic alterations revealed in NMR spectra during experimental liver fibrosis and cirrhosis induction, characterize the stage of fibrosis and could be illustrated by subsequent PCA of the spectra. Additionally, the PCA plots of the serum samples presented marked clustering during fibrosis progression andmore » could be extended in clinical diagnosis for the management of cirrhotic patients.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis Zografou, 15771 Athens (Greece)
  2. (Greece)
  3. Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75, Mikras Asias str., 11527 Athens (Greece)
  4. Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis Zografou, 15771 Athens (Greece). E-mail: mikros@pharm.uoa.gr
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976833
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 218; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.007; PII: S0041-008X(06)00364-4; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DIAGNOSIS; DRINKING WATER; FIBROSIS; HYDROGEN 1; INJURIES; LIPIDS; LIVER; NMR SPECTRA; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; PATIENTS; PATTERN RECOGNITION; PERFORMANCE; RATS; SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Constantinou, Maria A., Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75, Mikras Asias str., 11527 Athens, Theocharis, Stamatios E., and Mikros, Emmanuel. Application of metabonomics on an experimental model of fibrosis and cirrhosis induced by thioacetamide in rats. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.007.
Constantinou, Maria A., Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75, Mikras Asias str., 11527 Athens, Theocharis, Stamatios E., & Mikros, Emmanuel. Application of metabonomics on an experimental model of fibrosis and cirrhosis induced by thioacetamide in rats. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.007.
Constantinou, Maria A., Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75, Mikras Asias str., 11527 Athens, Theocharis, Stamatios E., and Mikros, Emmanuel. Mon . "Application of metabonomics on an experimental model of fibrosis and cirrhosis induced by thioacetamide in rats". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.007.
@article{osti_20976833,
title = {Application of metabonomics on an experimental model of fibrosis and cirrhosis induced by thioacetamide in rats},
author = {Constantinou, Maria A. and Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75, Mikras Asias str., 11527 Athens and Theocharis, Stamatios E. and Mikros, Emmanuel},
abstractNote = {Metabonomics has already been used to discriminate different pathological states in biological fields. The metabolic profiles of chronic experimental fibrosis and cirrhosis induction in rats were investigated using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy of liver extracts and serum combined with pattern recognition techniques. Rats were continuously administered with thioacetamide (TAA) in the drinking water (300 mg TAA/L), and sacrificed on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd month of treatment. {sup 1}H NMR spectra of aqueous and lipid liver extracts, together with serum were subjected to Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Liver portions were also subjected to histopathological examination and biochemical determination of malondialdehyde (MDA). Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis were progressively induced in TAA-treated rats, verified by the histopathological examination and the alterations of MDA levels. TAA administration revealed a number of changes in the {sup 1}H NMR spectra compared to control samples. The performance of PCA in liver extracts and serum, discriminated the control samples from the fibrotic and cirrhotic ones. Metabolic alterations revealed in NMR spectra during experimental liver fibrosis and cirrhosis induction, characterize the stage of fibrosis and could be illustrated by subsequent PCA of the spectra. Additionally, the PCA plots of the serum samples presented marked clustering during fibrosis progression and could be extended in clinical diagnosis for the management of cirrhotic patients.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.007},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 1,
volume = 218,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Selenium reduction in cirrhosis is frequently reported. The known beneficial effect of selenium supplementation on cirrhosis is probably obtained from nutritionally selenium-deficient subjects. Whether selenium supplementation truly improves cirrhosis in general needs additional experimental investigation. Thioacetamide was used to induce cirrhosis in selenium-adequate and -deficient mice. Selenoenzyme activity and selenium content were measured and the influence of selenium supplementation was evaluated. In Se-adequate mice, thioacetamide-mediated rapid onset of hepatic oxidative stress resulted in an increase in thioredoxin reductase activity and a decrease in both glutathione peroxidase activity and selenium content. The inverse activity of selenoenzymes (i.e. TrxR activity goes upmore » and GPx activity goes down) was persistent and mute to selenium supplementation during the progress of cirrhosis; accordingly, cirrhosis was not improved by selenium supplementation in any period. On the other hand, selenium supplementation to selenium-deficient mice always more efficiently increased hepatic glutathione peroxidase activity and selenium content compared with those treated with thioacetamide, indicating that thioacetamide impairs the liver bioavailability of selenium. Although thioacetamide profoundly affects hepatic selenium status in selenium-adequate mice, selenium supplementation does not modify the changes. Selenium supplementation to cirrhotic subjects with a background of nutritional selenium deficiency can improve selenium status but cannot restore hepatic glutathione peroxidase and selenium to normal levels.« less
  • Rennin-angiotensin system is involved in liver fibrogenesis through activating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Telmisartan (Tel) is an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, could function as a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} activator. Here we studied the effect of Tel on liver fibrosis, pre-neoplastic lesions in vivo and primary HSCs in vitro. In vivo study, we used the choline-deficient L-amino acid-defined (CDAA)-diet induced rat NASH model. The rats were fed the CDAA diet for 8 weeks to induce liver fibrosis and pre-neoplastic lesions, and then co-administrated with Tel for another 10 weeks. Tel prevented liver fibrogenesis and pre-neoplastic lesions bymore » down-regulating TGF{beta}1 and TIMP-1, 2 and increasing MMP-13 expression. Tel inhibited HSCs activation and proliferation. These results suggested that Tel could be a promising drug for NASH related liver fibrosis.« less
  • Changes in collagen metabolism were examined in 3 models of acute respiratory disease in rats. Fibrotic changes in the lungs of rats were provoked by exposing them to paraquat (intraperitoneal), ozone (inhaled), or bleomycin (intratracheally injected). After an interval sufficient to allow histologically discernible fibrosis to occur (6 to 7 days), lungs were removed from the rats, and apparent collagen synthesis rates were determined with cultured lung minces incubated in medium containing 3H-proline. Portions of the 3H-proline-labeled lung minces were then used for quantifying ratios of Type I to Type III collagen. There was no change in Type I/Type IIImore » collagen for total unlabeled collagen, nor was there any detectable increase of total collagen per lung after 1 week. We conclude that an early event in experimental acute respiratory disease is a marked increase in the relative synthesis of Type I collagen; this shift occurs before there is observable increased accumulation of collagen in the lung.« less
  • Previous studies failed to demonstrate a genetic predisposition to liver disease in cystic fibrosis. In order to characterize patients with cirrhosis defined on the basis of either hepatosplenomegaly, portal hypertension or liver biopsy, we analyzed a total number of 110 cirrhotic CF patients from different CF centers in France. Of them, 71 are males, which is not different from the overall CF french population. All but 2 are pancreatic insufficient. A history of meconium ileus {plus_minus} meconium ileus equivalent seems to be a risk factor for cirrhosis since these complications are present in 29% of the cirrhotic patients vs. 19%more » in the non-cirrhotic population (p = 0.03). This confirms our previous data in a postmortem study. Genotype analysis was performed in all the patients. {Delta}F508 represents 70% of the identified mutations with a higher proportion of {Delta}F508 +/+ in the cirrhotic than in the non-cirrhotic population (52% vs. 42%, p=0.003), 35% {Delta}F508 +/- vs. 42% and 13% {Delta}F508 -/- vs. 16%. Sixty percent of the other mutations associated with cirrhosis are identified, usually in {Delta}F508 +/- and include 1303 N-K, 542 G-X, 1078 del T, 1282 W-X, 1313 Q-X, 827 E-X, 1061 G-R, 1301 N-H, 14 K-X, 1717-1 G-A, 1918 delGC, 2183 A-G, 2184 delA, 405+1 G-A, 507 {Delta}l, 574 delA, 621+1 G-T, 85 G-E and 1303 N-K/other, 227 L-R/other. None of the cirrhotic patients bear one of the dominant missense mutations regarded as mild with respect to pancreatic function (117 R-H, 334 R-W, 347 R-P, 455 A-E, 574 P-H) or both the {Delta}F508 and the 5512 G-A mutations associated with a decreased risk of meconium ileus. Cirrhosis could thus be linked to the presence of 2 of the severe mutations of the CF gene associated with pancreatic insufficiency.« less