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Title: Interface chemistry and epitaxial growth modes of SrF{sub 2} on Si(001)

Abstract

Molecular beam epitaxy has been used to grow SrF{sub 2} thin films on Si(001). The growth modes have been investigated by atomic force microscopy, electron diffraction, and photoemission. Two principal growth regimes have been identified: (i) when deposition is carried out with the substrate held at a temperature of 700-750 deg. C, SrF{sub 2} molecules react with the substrate giving rise to a Sr-rich wetting layer on top of which three dimensional bulklike fluoride ridges develop; (ii) when deposition is carried out with the substrate held at 400 deg. C, a nanopatterned film forms with characteristic triangular islands. Results are compared to the growth mode of CaF{sub 2} on Si(001) under analogous deposition conditions. Morphological and structural differences between the two systems are associated with the larger lattice parameter of SrF{sub 2} with respect to CaF{sub 2}, resulting in a larger mismatch with the Si substrate.

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ;  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4]
  1. Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell'Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100-Modena (Italy)
  2. RAS, Solid State Optics Department, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya, 194021 St. Petersburg, (Russian Federation)
  3. INFM-CNR-TASC Laboratory, s.s. 14, km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza (Italy)
  4. (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976701
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.075403; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CALCIUM FLUORIDES; DEPOSITION; ELECTRON DIFFRACTION; INTERFACES; LATTICE PARAMETERS; LAYERS; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; PHOTOEMISSION; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON; STRONTIUM FLUORIDES; SUBSTRATES; SURFACES; THIN FILMS; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Pasquali, L., Suturin, S. M., Kaveev, A. K., Ulin, V. P., Sokolov, N. S., Doyle, B. P., Nannarone, S., and INFM-CNR-TASC Laboratory, s.s. 14, km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza. Interface chemistry and epitaxial growth modes of SrF{sub 2} on Si(001). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.075403.
Pasquali, L., Suturin, S. M., Kaveev, A. K., Ulin, V. P., Sokolov, N. S., Doyle, B. P., Nannarone, S., & INFM-CNR-TASC Laboratory, s.s. 14, km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza. Interface chemistry and epitaxial growth modes of SrF{sub 2} on Si(001). United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.075403.
Pasquali, L., Suturin, S. M., Kaveev, A. K., Ulin, V. P., Sokolov, N. S., Doyle, B. P., Nannarone, S., and INFM-CNR-TASC Laboratory, s.s. 14, km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza. Thu . "Interface chemistry and epitaxial growth modes of SrF{sub 2} on Si(001)". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.075403.
@article{osti_20976701,
title = {Interface chemistry and epitaxial growth modes of SrF{sub 2} on Si(001)},
author = {Pasquali, L. and Suturin, S. M. and Kaveev, A. K. and Ulin, V. P. and Sokolov, N. S. and Doyle, B. P. and Nannarone, S. and INFM-CNR-TASC Laboratory, s.s. 14, km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza},
abstractNote = {Molecular beam epitaxy has been used to grow SrF{sub 2} thin films on Si(001). The growth modes have been investigated by atomic force microscopy, electron diffraction, and photoemission. Two principal growth regimes have been identified: (i) when deposition is carried out with the substrate held at a temperature of 700-750 deg. C, SrF{sub 2} molecules react with the substrate giving rise to a Sr-rich wetting layer on top of which three dimensional bulklike fluoride ridges develop; (ii) when deposition is carried out with the substrate held at 400 deg. C, a nanopatterned film forms with characteristic triangular islands. Results are compared to the growth mode of CaF{sub 2} on Si(001) under analogous deposition conditions. Morphological and structural differences between the two systems are associated with the larger lattice parameter of SrF{sub 2} with respect to CaF{sub 2}, resulting in a larger mismatch with the Si substrate.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.075403},
journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 7,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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