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Title: Possible transmission experiments with low-velocity helium droplets

Abstract

We show that very low velocity droplets can be used to carry out an experiment to test whether condensate mediated transmission processes can occur in a superfluid droplet of {sup 4}He. By appropriately choosing the droplet radius and temperature, we can eliminate the competing roton, phonon, and ripplon mediated elastic transmission events. Then a calculation shows that if a few percent or more of the incident atoms experience anomalous condensate mediated transmission, the effects should be detectable in the droplet trajectories. We consider two forms of the experiment, involving a freely falling droplet in ambient vapor in the first instance and an oscillating droplet in a magnetic trap in the second.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976676
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.054506; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATOMS; CONDENSATES; DROPLETS; HELIUM 4; PHONONS; SUPERFLUIDITY; TRANSMISSION; VAPORS; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Wynveen, A., Lidke, K. A., Lutsyshyn, Y., and Halley, J. W.. Possible transmission experiments with low-velocity helium droplets. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.054506.
Wynveen, A., Lidke, K. A., Lutsyshyn, Y., & Halley, J. W.. Possible transmission experiments with low-velocity helium droplets. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.054506.
Wynveen, A., Lidke, K. A., Lutsyshyn, Y., and Halley, J. W.. Thu . "Possible transmission experiments with low-velocity helium droplets". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.054506.
@article{osti_20976676,
title = {Possible transmission experiments with low-velocity helium droplets},
author = {Wynveen, A. and Lidke, K. A. and Lutsyshyn, Y. and Halley, J. W.},
abstractNote = {We show that very low velocity droplets can be used to carry out an experiment to test whether condensate mediated transmission processes can occur in a superfluid droplet of {sup 4}He. By appropriately choosing the droplet radius and temperature, we can eliminate the competing roton, phonon, and ripplon mediated elastic transmission events. Then a calculation shows that if a few percent or more of the incident atoms experience anomalous condensate mediated transmission, the effects should be detectable in the droplet trajectories. We consider two forms of the experiment, involving a freely falling droplet in ambient vapor in the first instance and an oscillating droplet in a magnetic trap in the second.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.054506},
journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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