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Title: Intensity modulation with respiratory gating for radiotherapy of the pleural space

Abstract

We wanted to describe a technique for the implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a real-time position monitor (RPM) respiratory gating system for the treatment of pleural space with intact lung. The technique is illustrated by a case of pediatric osteosarcoma, metastatic to the pleura of the right lung. The patient was simulated in the supine position where a breathing tracer and computed tomography (CT) scans synchronized at end expiration were acquired using the RPM system. The gated CT images were used to define target volumes and critical structures. Right pleural gated IMRT delivered at end expiration was prescribed to a dose of 44 Gy, with 55 Gy delivered to areas of higher risk via simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique. IMRT was necessary to avoid exceeding the tolerance of intact lung. Although very good coverage of the target volume was achieved with a shell-shaped dose distribution, dose over the targets was relatively inhomogeneous. Portions of target volumes necessarily intruded into the right lung, the liver, and right kidney, limiting the degree of normal tissue sparing that could be achieved. The radiation doses to critical structures were acceptable and well tolerated. With intact lung, delivering a relatively high dose to themore » pleura with acceptable doses to surrounding normal tissues using respiratory gated pleural IMRT is feasible. Treatment delivery during a limited part of the respiratory cycle allows for reduced CT target volume motion errors, with reduction in the portion of the planning margin that accounts for respiratory motion, and subsequent increase in the therapeutic ratio.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States). E-mail: suzrusso@msn.com
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20975197
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Dosimetry; Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.meddos.2006.10.002; PII: S0958-3947(06)00151-8; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; ERRORS; HEALTH HAZARDS; KIDNEYS; LIVER; LUNGS; METASTASES; MODULATION; OSTEOSARCOMAS; PATIENTS; PEDIATRICS; PLANNING; PLEURA; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Ahmed, Raef S., Shen, Sui, Ove, Roger, Duan, Jun, Fiveash, John B., and Russo, Suzanne M. Intensity modulation with respiratory gating for radiotherapy of the pleural space. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.meddos.2006.10.002.
Ahmed, Raef S., Shen, Sui, Ove, Roger, Duan, Jun, Fiveash, John B., & Russo, Suzanne M. Intensity modulation with respiratory gating for radiotherapy of the pleural space. United States. doi:10.1016/j.meddos.2006.10.002.
Ahmed, Raef S., Shen, Sui, Ove, Roger, Duan, Jun, Fiveash, John B., and Russo, Suzanne M. Sun . "Intensity modulation with respiratory gating for radiotherapy of the pleural space". United States. doi:10.1016/j.meddos.2006.10.002.
@article{osti_20975197,
title = {Intensity modulation with respiratory gating for radiotherapy of the pleural space},
author = {Ahmed, Raef S. and Shen, Sui and Ove, Roger and Duan, Jun and Fiveash, John B. and Russo, Suzanne M.},
abstractNote = {We wanted to describe a technique for the implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a real-time position monitor (RPM) respiratory gating system for the treatment of pleural space with intact lung. The technique is illustrated by a case of pediatric osteosarcoma, metastatic to the pleura of the right lung. The patient was simulated in the supine position where a breathing tracer and computed tomography (CT) scans synchronized at end expiration were acquired using the RPM system. The gated CT images were used to define target volumes and critical structures. Right pleural gated IMRT delivered at end expiration was prescribed to a dose of 44 Gy, with 55 Gy delivered to areas of higher risk via simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique. IMRT was necessary to avoid exceeding the tolerance of intact lung. Although very good coverage of the target volume was achieved with a shell-shaped dose distribution, dose over the targets was relatively inhomogeneous. Portions of target volumes necessarily intruded into the right lung, the liver, and right kidney, limiting the degree of normal tissue sparing that could be achieved. The radiation doses to critical structures were acceptable and well tolerated. With intact lung, delivering a relatively high dose to the pleura with acceptable doses to surrounding normal tissues using respiratory gated pleural IMRT is feasible. Treatment delivery during a limited part of the respiratory cycle allows for reduced CT target volume motion errors, with reduction in the portion of the planning margin that accounts for respiratory motion, and subsequent increase in the therapeutic ratio.},
doi = {10.1016/j.meddos.2006.10.002},
journal = {Medical Dosimetry},
number = 1,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Purpose: A planning study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), a volumetric modulated arc technique, on malignant pleural mesothelioma. The benchmark was conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: The computed tomography data sets of 6 patients were included. The plans for IMRT with nine fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with a single isocenter. All plans were optimized for 15-MV photon beams. The dose prescription was 54 Gy to the planning target volume. The planning objectives for the planning target volume were a minimal dose of >95% and maximal dose of <107%. For the organs at risk,more » the parameters were as follows: contralateral lung, percentage of volume receiving 5 Gy (V{sub 5Gy}) <60%, V{sub 20Gy} < 10%, mean <10.0 Gy; liver, V{sub 30Gy} <33%, mean <31 Gy; heart, V{sub 45Gy} <30%, V{sub 50Gy} <20%, dose received by 1% of the volume (D{sub 1%}) <60 Gy; contralateral kidney, V{sub 15Gy} <20%; spine, D{sub 1%} <45 Gy; esophagus, V{sub 55Gy} <30%; and spleen, V{sub 40Gy} <50%. The monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were scored to measure the treatment efficiency. The pretreatment portal dosimetry scored delivery to the calculation agreement with the Gamma Agreement Index. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity. Both techniques fulfilled objectives on organs at risk with a tendency of RA to improve sparing. The conformity index was 1.9 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT. The number of MU/2Gy was 734 {+-} 82 for RA and 2,195 {+-} 317 for IMRT. The planning vs. delivery agreement revealed a Gamma Agreement Index for IMRT of 96.0% {+-} 2.6% and for RA of 95.7% {+-} 1.5%. The treatment time was 3.7 {+-} 0.3min for RA and 13.4 {+-} 0.1min for IMRT. Conclusion: RA demonstrated compared with conventional IMRT, similar target coverage and better dose sparing to the organs at risks. The number of MUs and the time required to deliver a 2-Gy fraction were much lower for RA, allowing the possibility to incorporate this technique in the treatment options for mesothelioma patients.« less
  • This study evaluates the effects of respiratory motion on breast radiotherapy delivered using segmented multileaf collimator (SMLC) intensity modulation. An anthropomorphic breast phantom was constructed of polystyrene plates between which radiographic films were inserted. The phantom was mounted on a moving platform to simulate one-dimensional sinusoidal oscillation with variable amplitude and frequency. The motion effect on two breast IMRT techniques, a beamlet-based plan created using the Corvus treatment planning system and an aperture-based plan, was evaluated via film comparison. Motion-induced differences in the treatment region are generally within {+-}5%, with the exception of the posterior field edge and the apexmore » of the breast in the Corvus IMRT plan. Considering the experimental uncertainty arising from the setup and film dosimetry, this result indicates that respiratory motion-induced dose variations are generally relatively insignificant. It appears that the anterior hot spots observed in the Corvus IMRT plan result from the high intensity fluence delivered to the ''virtual bolus'' area which must be created during the planning process in order to provide ''flash'' for the respiratory motion. The potential magnitude of such effects resulting from the interplay between fluence modulation and patient motion are unique to the individual planning system and planning technique, as well as the delivery equipment and technique. Such effects should be carefully investigated prior to the implementation of IMRT for breast radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: In patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are unable to undergo pneumonectomy, it is difficult to deliver tumoricidal radiation doses to the pleura without significant toxicity. We have implemented a technique of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat these patients, and we report the feasibility and toxicity of this approach. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 36 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma and two intact lungs (i.e., no previous pneumonectomy) were treated with pleural IMRT to the hemithorax (median dose, 46.8 Gy; range, 41.4-50.4) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results: Of the 36 patients, 56% had right-sided tumors.more » The histologic type was epithelial in 78%, sarcomatoid in 6%, and mixed in 17%, and 6% had Stage I, 28% had Stage II, 33% had Stage III, and 33% had Stage IV. Thirty-two patients (89%) received induction chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and pemetrexed); 56% underwent pleurectomy/decortication before IMRT and 44% did not undergo resection. Of the 36 patients evaluable for acute toxicity, 7 (20%) had Grade 3 or worse pneumonitis (including 1 death) and 2 had Grade 3 fatigue. In 30 patients assessable for late toxicity, 5 had continuing Grade 3 pneumonitis. For patients treated with surgery, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 75% and 53%, and the median survival was 26 months. For patients who did not undergo surgical resection, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 69% and 28%, and the median survival was 17 months. Conclusions: Treating the intact lung with pleural IMRT in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma is a safe and feasible treatment option with an acceptable rate of pneumonitis. Additionally, the survival rates were encouraging in our retrospective series, particularly for the patients who underwent pleurectomy/decortication. We have initiated a Phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with pemetrexed and cisplatin with or without pleurectomy/decortication, followed by pleural IMRT to prospectively evaluate the toxicity and survival.« less
  • Purpose: to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological consequences from having different gating windows, dose rates, and breathing patterns in gated VMAT lung radiotherapy. Methods: A novel 3D-printed moving phantom with central high and peripheral low tracer uptake regions was 4D FDG-PET/CT-scanned using ideal, patient-specific regular, and irregular breathing patterns. A scan of the stationary phantom was obtained as a reference. Target volumes corresponding to different uptake regions were delineated. Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) 6 MV VMAT plans were produced for conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy, using 30–70 and 100% cycle gating scenarios. Prescribed doses were 200 cGy with SIB to 240more » cGy to high uptake volume for conventional, and 800 with SIB to 900 cGy for hypofractionated plans. Dose rates of 600 MU/min (conventional and hypofractionated) and flattening filter free 1400 MU/min (hypofractionated) were used. Ion chamber measurements were performed to verify delivered doses. Vials with A549 cells placed in locations matching ion chamber measurements were irradiated using the same plans to measure clonogenic survival. Differences in survival for the different doses, dose rates, gating windows, and breathing patterns were analyzed. Results: Ion chamber measurements agreed within 3% of the planned dose, for all locations, breathing patterns and gating windows. Cell survival depended on dose alone, and not on gating window, breathing pattern, MU rate, or delivery time. The surviving fraction varied from approximately 40% at 2Gy to 1% for 9 Gy and was within statistical uncertainty relative to that observed for the stationary phantom. Conclusions: Use of gated VMAT in PET-driven SIB radiotherapy was validated using ion chamber measurements and cell survival assays for conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy.« less
  • A time delay in a respiratory gating system could cause an unexpected phase mismatch for synchronized gating radiotherapy. This study presents a method of identifying and measuring the time delay in a gating system. Various port films were taken for a motion phantom at different gating window levels with a very narrow window size. The time delay for the gating system was determined by comparing the motion curve (the position of a moving object versus the gating time) measured in the port films to the motion curve determined by the video cameras. The measured time delay for a linac-based gatingmore » system was 0.17{+-}0.03 s. This time delay could induce target missing if it was not properly taken into account for the synchronized gating radiotherapy. Measurement/verification of the time delay should be considered as an important part of the accepting/commissioning test before the clinical use of the gating system.« less