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Title: Planar radiative shock experiments and their comparison to simulations

Abstract

Recent experiments have obtained radiographic data from shock waves driven at >100 km/s in xenon gas, and Thomson scattering data from similar experiments using argon gas. Presented here is a review of these experiments, followed by an outline of the discrepancies between the data and the results of one-dimensional simulations. Simulations using procedures that work well for similar but nonradiative experiments show inconsistencies between the measured position of the interface of the beryllium and xenon and the calculated position for these experiments. Sources of the discrepancy are explored.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Atmospheric Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)
  2. Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)
  3. Observatoire de Paris, 5 place J. Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20975077
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2714023; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ARGON; BERYLLIUM; INTERFACES; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; PLASMA; PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS; PLASMA SIMULATION; SHOCK WAVES; THOMSON SCATTERING; XENON

Citation Formats

Reighard, A. B., Drake, R. P., Mucino, J. E., Knauer, J. P., and Busquet, M. Planar radiative shock experiments and their comparison to simulations. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2714023.
Reighard, A. B., Drake, R. P., Mucino, J. E., Knauer, J. P., & Busquet, M. Planar radiative shock experiments and their comparison to simulations. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2714023.
Reighard, A. B., Drake, R. P., Mucino, J. E., Knauer, J. P., and Busquet, M. Tue . "Planar radiative shock experiments and their comparison to simulations". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2714023.
@article{osti_20975077,
title = {Planar radiative shock experiments and their comparison to simulations},
author = {Reighard, A. B. and Drake, R. P. and Mucino, J. E. and Knauer, J. P. and Busquet, M.},
abstractNote = {Recent experiments have obtained radiographic data from shock waves driven at >100 km/s in xenon gas, and Thomson scattering data from similar experiments using argon gas. Presented here is a review of these experiments, followed by an outline of the discrepancies between the data and the results of one-dimensional simulations. Simulations using procedures that work well for similar but nonradiative experiments show inconsistencies between the measured position of the interface of the beryllium and xenon and the calculated position for these experiments. Sources of the discrepancy are explored.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2714023},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 5,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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