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Title: On the relation between secondary and modulational instabilities

Abstract

The nonlinear saturation of microinstabilities in toroidal magnetoplasmas is sometimes discussed in the framework of secondary instability theory. At the same time, it has been proposed that the nonlinear generation of zonal flows--which are often responsible for turbulence control--can be explained in terms of modulational instabilities. The question of how these two approaches are connected to each other is addressed.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20974926
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2720370; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; PLASMA; PLASMA INSTABILITY; TURBULENCE

Citation Formats

Strintzi, D., and Jenko, F. On the relation between secondary and modulational instabilities. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2720370.
Strintzi, D., & Jenko, F. On the relation between secondary and modulational instabilities. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2720370.
Strintzi, D., and Jenko, F. Sun . "On the relation between secondary and modulational instabilities". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2720370.
@article{osti_20974926,
title = {On the relation between secondary and modulational instabilities},
author = {Strintzi, D. and Jenko, F.},
abstractNote = {The nonlinear saturation of microinstabilities in toroidal magnetoplasmas is sometimes discussed in the framework of secondary instability theory. At the same time, it has been proposed that the nonlinear generation of zonal flows--which are often responsible for turbulence control--can be explained in terms of modulational instabilities. The question of how these two approaches are connected to each other is addressed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2720370},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 4,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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