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Title: Classical and quantum dynamics of a model for atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates

Abstract

We study a model for a two-mode atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensate. Starting with a classical analysis we determine the phase space fixed points of the system. It is found that bifurcations of the fixed points naturally separate the coupling parameter space into four regions. The different regions give rise to qualitatively different dynamics. We then show that this classification holds true for the quantum dynamics.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Instituto de Fisica da UFRGS, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)
  2. Centre for Mathematical Physics, School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, Queensland 4072 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20974625
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.023609; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BIFURCATION; BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATION; COUPLING; DYNAMICS; PHASE SPACE; QUANTUM MECHANICS

Citation Formats

Santos, G., Tonel, A., Foerster, A., and Links, J. Classical and quantum dynamics of a model for atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.023609.
Santos, G., Tonel, A., Foerster, A., & Links, J. Classical and quantum dynamics of a model for atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.023609.
Santos, G., Tonel, A., Foerster, A., and Links, J. Wed . "Classical and quantum dynamics of a model for atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.023609.
@article{osti_20974625,
title = {Classical and quantum dynamics of a model for atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates},
author = {Santos, G. and Tonel, A. and Foerster, A. and Links, J.},
abstractNote = {We study a model for a two-mode atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensate. Starting with a classical analysis we determine the phase space fixed points of the system. It is found that bifurcations of the fixed points naturally separate the coupling parameter space into four regions. The different regions give rise to qualitatively different dynamics. We then show that this classification holds true for the quantum dynamics.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.023609},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 2,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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