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Title: Quantum transducers: Integrating transmission lines and nanomechanical resonators via charge qubits

Abstract

We propose a mechanism to interface a transmission line resonator (TLR) with a nanomechanical resonator (NAMR) by commonly coupling them to a charge qubit, a Cooper-pair box with a controllable gate voltage. Integrated in this quantum transducer or simple quantum network, the charge qubit plays the role of a controllable quantum node coherently exchanging quantum information between the TLR and NAMR. With such an interface, a quasiclassical state of the NAMR can be created by controlling a single-mode classical current in the TLR. Alternatively, a 'Cooper pair' coherent output through the transmission line can be driven by a single-mode classical oscillation of the NAMR.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4]
  1. Frontier Research System, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)
  2. (China)
  3. Frontier Research System, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)
  4. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20974534
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.022318; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COOPER PAIRS; INFORMATION THEORY; INTERFACES; NANOSTRUCTURES; OSCILLATIONS; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUANTUM MECHANICS; QUBITS; RESONATORS; TRANSDUCERS

Citation Formats

Sun, C. P., Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, Wei, L. F., Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030, Liu Yuxi, Nori, Franco, and Center for Theoretical Physics, Physics Department, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040. Quantum transducers: Integrating transmission lines and nanomechanical resonators via charge qubits. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.022318.
Sun, C. P., Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, Wei, L. F., Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030, Liu Yuxi, Nori, Franco, & Center for Theoretical Physics, Physics Department, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040. Quantum transducers: Integrating transmission lines and nanomechanical resonators via charge qubits. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.022318.
Sun, C. P., Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, Wei, L. F., Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030, Liu Yuxi, Nori, Franco, and Center for Theoretical Physics, Physics Department, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040. Wed . "Quantum transducers: Integrating transmission lines and nanomechanical resonators via charge qubits". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.022318.
@article{osti_20974534,
title = {Quantum transducers: Integrating transmission lines and nanomechanical resonators via charge qubits},
author = {Sun, C. P. and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 and Wei, L. F. and Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 and Liu Yuxi and Nori, Franco and Center for Theoretical Physics, Physics Department, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040},
abstractNote = {We propose a mechanism to interface a transmission line resonator (TLR) with a nanomechanical resonator (NAMR) by commonly coupling them to a charge qubit, a Cooper-pair box with a controllable gate voltage. Integrated in this quantum transducer or simple quantum network, the charge qubit plays the role of a controllable quantum node coherently exchanging quantum information between the TLR and NAMR. With such an interface, a quasiclassical state of the NAMR can be created by controlling a single-mode classical current in the TLR. Alternatively, a 'Cooper pair' coherent output through the transmission line can be driven by a single-mode classical oscillation of the NAMR.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.73.022318},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 2,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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