skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Nuclear rDNA and chloroplast rbcL, rbcS and IGS sequence data, and their implications from the Japanese, Korean, and North American harmful algae, Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae)

Abstract

The toxic Heterosigma akashiwo has been found in coastal environments and its algal blooms have been associated with mass mortality in marine organisms and farmed fish. Over the last two decades, H. akashiwo has expanded its geographical range on a worldwide scale, though all populations are suspected to be a single species. To find strong molecular evidence, supporting this hypothesis we determined nuclear 18S , ITS and LSU rDNA, and chloroplast rbcL, rbcS and flanking IGS sequences from six isolates located in North America, Japan and Korea. We compared individual loci from molecular regions (e.g., 26.7 kbp of DNA sequence) and found all the isolates to have an identical genotype. Further, the long sequences allow us to compare all the partial sequences that have been reported from samples obtained in ten countries. All these sequence are nearly identical. This suggests that they have dispersed recently from one location. The sequences revealed here can be used as an additional option for making molecular comparisons of sequences from the same isolate.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China). E-mail: kijs@hanyang.ac.kr
  2. Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20972067
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Research; Journal Volume: 103; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2006.08.014; PII: S0013-9351(06)00191-5; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGAE; CHLOROPLASTS; DNA SEQUENCING; ENVIRONMENT; GENOTYPE; MORTALITY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Ki, Jang-Seu, and Han, Myung-Soo. Nuclear rDNA and chloroplast rbcL, rbcS and IGS sequence data, and their implications from the Japanese, Korean, and North American harmful algae, Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.envres.2006.08.014.
Ki, Jang-Seu, & Han, Myung-Soo. Nuclear rDNA and chloroplast rbcL, rbcS and IGS sequence data, and their implications from the Japanese, Korean, and North American harmful algae, Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae). United States. doi:10.1016/j.envres.2006.08.014.
Ki, Jang-Seu, and Han, Myung-Soo. Thu . "Nuclear rDNA and chloroplast rbcL, rbcS and IGS sequence data, and their implications from the Japanese, Korean, and North American harmful algae, Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae)". United States. doi:10.1016/j.envres.2006.08.014.
@article{osti_20972067,
title = {Nuclear rDNA and chloroplast rbcL, rbcS and IGS sequence data, and their implications from the Japanese, Korean, and North American harmful algae, Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae)},
author = {Ki, Jang-Seu and Han, Myung-Soo},
abstractNote = {The toxic Heterosigma akashiwo has been found in coastal environments and its algal blooms have been associated with mass mortality in marine organisms and farmed fish. Over the last two decades, H. akashiwo has expanded its geographical range on a worldwide scale, though all populations are suspected to be a single species. To find strong molecular evidence, supporting this hypothesis we determined nuclear 18S , ITS and LSU rDNA, and chloroplast rbcL, rbcS and flanking IGS sequences from six isolates located in North America, Japan and Korea. We compared individual loci from molecular regions (e.g., 26.7 kbp of DNA sequence) and found all the isolates to have an identical genotype. Further, the long sequences allow us to compare all the partial sequences that have been reported from samples obtained in ten countries. All these sequence are nearly identical. This suggests that they have dispersed recently from one location. The sequences revealed here can be used as an additional option for making molecular comparisons of sequences from the same isolate.},
doi = {10.1016/j.envres.2006.08.014},
journal = {Environmental Research},
number = 3,
volume = 103,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The Clinton Administration is pursuing a negotiated solution to the nuclear issue with North Korea that involves both economic and political incentives. But Pyongyang remains deeply suspious that South Korea is scheming to absorb the North and with United States and Japanese help in a repition of the German model. This has been and will continue to be the key factor conditioning Pyongyang`s approach to the nuclear problem.
  • Seismic waveform correlation offers the prospect of greatly reducing event detection thresholds when compared with more conventional processing methods. Correlation is applicable for seismic events that in some sense repeat, that is they have very similar waveforms. A number of recent studies have shown that correlated seismic signals may form a significant fraction of seismicity at regional distances. For the particular case of multiple nuclear explosions at the same test site, regional distance correlation also allows very precise relative location measurements and could offer the potential to lower thresholds when multiple events exist. Using the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) Internationalmore » Monitoring System (IMS) seismic array at Matsushiro, Japan (MJAR), Gibbons and Ringdal (2012) were able to create a multichannel correlation detector with a very low false alarm rate and a threshold below magnitude 3.0. They did this using the 2006 or 2009 Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) nuclear explosion as a template to search through a data stream from the same station to find a match via waveform correlation. In this paper, we extend the work of Gibbons and Ringdal (2012) and measure the correlation detection threshold at several other IMS arrays. We use this to address three main points. First, we show the IMS array station at Mina, Nevada (NVAR), which is closest to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), is able to detect a chemical explosion that is well under 1 ton with the right template. Second, we examine the two IMS arrays closest to the North Korean (DPRK) test site (at Ussuriysk, Russian Federation [USRK] and Wonju, Republic of Korea [KSRS]) to show that similarly low thresholds are possible when the right templates exist. We also extend the work of Schaff et al. (2012) and measure the correlation detection threshold at the nearest Global Seismic Network (GSN) three-component station (MDJ) at Mudanjiang, Heilongjiang Province, China, from the New China Digital Seismograph Network (IC). To conclude, we use these results to explore the recent claim by Zhang and Wen (2015) that the DPRK conducted “…a low-yield nuclear test…” on 12 May 2010.« less
  • Here, the detectability of emission sources, defined by a low-level of mixing with other sources, was estimated for various locations surrounding the Sea of Japan, including a site within North Korea. A high-resolution meteorological model coupled to a dispersion model was used to simulate plume dynamics for four periods, and two metrics of airborne plume mixing were calculated for each source. While emissions from several known sources in this area tended to blend with others while dispersing downwind, the North Korean plume often remained relatively distinct, thereby making it potentially easier to unambiguously ‘backtrack’ it to its source.