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Title: Disaster incubation, cumulative impacts and the urban/ex-urban/rural dynamic

Abstract

This article explores environmental impacts and risks that can accumulate in rural and ex-urban areas and regions and their relation to urban and global development forces. Two Southern Ontario cases are examined: an area level water disaster and cumulative change at the regional level. The role of disaster incubation analysis and advanced environmental assessment tools are discussed in terms of their potential to contribute to more enlightened and effective assessment and planning processes. It is concluded that conventional approaches to EA and planning are characteristically deficient in addressing the full range of impacts and risks, and particularly those originating from pathogens, dispersed and insidious sources. Rigorous application of disaster incubation analysis and more advanced forms of EA has considerable potential to influence a different pattern of planning and decision making.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada). E-mail: prm@yorku.ca
  2. Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada). E-mail: hali@yorku.ca
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20972049
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.eiar.2007.01.003; PII: S0195-9255(07)00014-5; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DECISION MAKING; EMERGENCY PLANS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; HAZARDS; ONTARIO; PATHOGENS; PLANNING; REMEDIAL ACTION; URBAN AREAS

Citation Formats

Mulvihill, Peter R., and Ali, S. Harris. Disaster incubation, cumulative impacts and the urban/ex-urban/rural dynamic. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2007.01.003.
Mulvihill, Peter R., & Ali, S. Harris. Disaster incubation, cumulative impacts and the urban/ex-urban/rural dynamic. United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2007.01.003.
Mulvihill, Peter R., and Ali, S. Harris. Tue . "Disaster incubation, cumulative impacts and the urban/ex-urban/rural dynamic". United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2007.01.003.
@article{osti_20972049,
title = {Disaster incubation, cumulative impacts and the urban/ex-urban/rural dynamic},
author = {Mulvihill, Peter R. and Ali, S. Harris},
abstractNote = {This article explores environmental impacts and risks that can accumulate in rural and ex-urban areas and regions and their relation to urban and global development forces. Two Southern Ontario cases are examined: an area level water disaster and cumulative change at the regional level. The role of disaster incubation analysis and advanced environmental assessment tools are discussed in terms of their potential to contribute to more enlightened and effective assessment and planning processes. It is concluded that conventional approaches to EA and planning are characteristically deficient in addressing the full range of impacts and risks, and particularly those originating from pathogens, dispersed and insidious sources. Rigorous application of disaster incubation analysis and more advanced forms of EA has considerable potential to influence a different pattern of planning and decision making.},
doi = {10.1016/j.eiar.2007.01.003},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = 4,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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