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Title: Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience

Abstract

During the last decade a number of environmental agreements (EAs) have been negotiated in Canada involving industry, government and Aboriginal peoples. This article draws on the Canadian experience to consider the potential of such negotiated agreements to address two issues widely recognised in academic and policy debates on environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental management. The first relates to the need to secure indigenous participation in environmental management of major projects that affect indigenous peoples. The second and broader issue involves the necessity for specific initiatives to ensure effective follow-up of EIA. The Canadian experience indicates that negotiated environmental agreements have considerable potential to address both issues. However, if this potential is to be realized, greater effort must be made to develop structures and processes specifically designed to encourage Aboriginal participation; and EAs must themselves provide the financial and other resource required to support EIA follow-up and Aboriginal participation.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Politics and Public Policy, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Brisbane, Nathan, Queensland 4111 (Australia). E-mail: Ciaran.Ofaircheallaigh@griffith.edu.au
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20972048
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.eiar.2006.12.002; PII: S0195-9255(06)00134-X; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CANADA; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION; INDUSTRY

Citation Formats

O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran. Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2006.12.002.
O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran. Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience. United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2006.12.002.
O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran. Tue . "Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience". United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2006.12.002.
@article{osti_20972048,
title = {Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience},
author = {O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran},
abstractNote = {During the last decade a number of environmental agreements (EAs) have been negotiated in Canada involving industry, government and Aboriginal peoples. This article draws on the Canadian experience to consider the potential of such negotiated agreements to address two issues widely recognised in academic and policy debates on environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental management. The first relates to the need to secure indigenous participation in environmental management of major projects that affect indigenous peoples. The second and broader issue involves the necessity for specific initiatives to ensure effective follow-up of EIA. The Canadian experience indicates that negotiated environmental agreements have considerable potential to address both issues. However, if this potential is to be realized, greater effort must be made to develop structures and processes specifically designed to encourage Aboriginal participation; and EAs must themselves provide the financial and other resource required to support EIA follow-up and Aboriginal participation.},
doi = {10.1016/j.eiar.2006.12.002},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = 4,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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