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Title: Nitrate contamination of groundwater: A conceptual management framework

Abstract

In many countries, public concern over the deterioration of groundwater quality from nitrate contamination has grown significantly in recent years. This concern has focused increasingly on anthropogenic sources as the potential cause of the problem. Evidence indicates that the nitrate (NO{sub 3}) levels routinely exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/l NO{sub 3}-N in many aquifer systems that underlie agriculture-dominated watersheds. Degradation of groundwater quality due to nitrate pollution along with the increasing demand for potable water has motivated the adoption of restoration actions of the contaminated aquifers. Restoration efforts have intensified the dire need for developing protection alternatives and management options such that the ultimate nitrate concentrations at the critical receptors are below the MCL. This paper presents a general conceptual framework for the management of groundwater contamination from nitrate. The management framework utilizes models of nitrate fate and transport in the unsaturated and saturated zones to simulate nitrate concentration at the critical receptors. To study the impact of different management options considering both environmental and economic aspects, the proposed framework incorporates a component of a multi-criteria decision analysis. To enhance spatiality in model development along with the management options, the utilization of a land use mapmore » is depicted for the allocation and computation of on-ground nitrogen loadings from the different sources.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Water and Environmental Studies Institute, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine (Country Unknown). E-mail: mnmasri@najah.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20972043
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.eiar.2006.11.002; PII: S0195-9255(06)00131-4; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AGRICULTURE; AQUIFERS; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; DRINKING WATER; FERTILIZERS; GROUND WATER; LAND USE; NITRATES; NITROGEN OXIDES; RECEPTORS

Citation Formats

Almasri, Mohammad N. Nitrate contamination of groundwater: A conceptual management framework. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2006.11.002.
Almasri, Mohammad N. Nitrate contamination of groundwater: A conceptual management framework. United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2006.11.002.
Almasri, Mohammad N. Sun . "Nitrate contamination of groundwater: A conceptual management framework". United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2006.11.002.
@article{osti_20972043,
title = {Nitrate contamination of groundwater: A conceptual management framework},
author = {Almasri, Mohammad N.},
abstractNote = {In many countries, public concern over the deterioration of groundwater quality from nitrate contamination has grown significantly in recent years. This concern has focused increasingly on anthropogenic sources as the potential cause of the problem. Evidence indicates that the nitrate (NO{sub 3}) levels routinely exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/l NO{sub 3}-N in many aquifer systems that underlie agriculture-dominated watersheds. Degradation of groundwater quality due to nitrate pollution along with the increasing demand for potable water has motivated the adoption of restoration actions of the contaminated aquifers. Restoration efforts have intensified the dire need for developing protection alternatives and management options such that the ultimate nitrate concentrations at the critical receptors are below the MCL. This paper presents a general conceptual framework for the management of groundwater contamination from nitrate. The management framework utilizes models of nitrate fate and transport in the unsaturated and saturated zones to simulate nitrate concentration at the critical receptors. To study the impact of different management options considering both environmental and economic aspects, the proposed framework incorporates a component of a multi-criteria decision analysis. To enhance spatiality in model development along with the management options, the utilization of a land use map is depicted for the allocation and computation of on-ground nitrogen loadings from the different sources.},
doi = {10.1016/j.eiar.2006.11.002},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = 3,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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