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Title: Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

Abstract

Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Tsuruoka National College of Technology, 104 Sawada, Inooka, Tsuruoka City, Yamagata 997-8511 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971939
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 21; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2742912; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BIOLUMINESCENCE; COLOR; LAYERS; LUCIFERASE; LUCIFERIN; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; NANOSTRUCTURES; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Nishiyama, Katsuhiko, Hoshino, Tadatsugu, and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2742912.
Nishiyama, Katsuhiko, Hoshino, Tadatsugu, & Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2742912.
Nishiyama, Katsuhiko, Hoshino, Tadatsugu, and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522. Mon . "Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2742912.
@article{osti_20971939,
title = {Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations},
author = {Nishiyama, Katsuhiko and Hoshino, Tadatsugu and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522},
abstractNote = {Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2742912},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 21,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon May 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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