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Title: In situ ion scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of stability and nanoscale oxidation of single crystal (100) InAs

Abstract

The authors report on the synthesis of clean and smooth surfaces of single crystal InAs (100) by hydrogen molecular cleaning along with in situ studies on the stability of such surfaces against oxide formation. Nanoscale oxidation studies have been performed in detail using in situ nuclear reaction analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ion channeling studies have been performed to verify atomically smooth surfaces after postcleaning. Stability and kinetic boundaries of cleaned InAs (100) surfaces against oxidation have been experimentally derived. These results are important not only in preparing clean surfaces of InAs but also in understanding fundamentals of oxide/III-V semiconductor interfaces.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971932
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 20; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2740200; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; INDIUM ARSENIDES; ION CHANNELING; MONOCRYSTALS; NANOSTRUCTURES; NUCLEAR REACTION ANALYSIS; OXIDATION; OXIDES; SCATTERING; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SURFACE CLEANING; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Chang, C.-L., Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam, Singhal, Subhash C., Ramanathan, Shriram, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, and Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138. In situ ion scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of stability and nanoscale oxidation of single crystal (100) InAs. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2740200.
Chang, C.-L., Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam, Singhal, Subhash C., Ramanathan, Shriram, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, & Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138. In situ ion scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of stability and nanoscale oxidation of single crystal (100) InAs. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2740200.
Chang, C.-L., Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam, Singhal, Subhash C., Ramanathan, Shriram, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, and Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138. Mon . "In situ ion scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of stability and nanoscale oxidation of single crystal (100) InAs". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2740200.
@article{osti_20971932,
title = {In situ ion scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of stability and nanoscale oxidation of single crystal (100) InAs},
author = {Chang, C.-L. and Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam and Singhal, Subhash C. and Ramanathan, Shriram and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 and Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138},
abstractNote = {The authors report on the synthesis of clean and smooth surfaces of single crystal InAs (100) by hydrogen molecular cleaning along with in situ studies on the stability of such surfaces against oxide formation. Nanoscale oxidation studies have been performed in detail using in situ nuclear reaction analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ion channeling studies have been performed to verify atomically smooth surfaces after postcleaning. Stability and kinetic boundaries of cleaned InAs (100) surfaces against oxidation have been experimentally derived. These results are important not only in preparing clean surfaces of InAs but also in understanding fundamentals of oxide/III-V semiconductor interfaces.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2740200},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 20,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Preparation of clean and smooth surfaces of InAs(100) by hydrogen molecular cleaning (HMC) along with in-situ studies of the nanoscale oxidation of pristine surfaces is studied. Removal of native oxides has been verified in-depth by in-situ nuclear reaction analysis(NRA) using the 16O(d,p)17O reaction and XPS. Further, ion channeling studies have been performed to verify atomically smooth surfaces after post-cleaning. Stability and kinetic boundaries of the cleaned InAs(100) surfaces against oxidation have also been experimentally derived and studied by NRA. These results are important not only to prepare clean surfaces of InAs, but also to understand fundamentals of oxide/III-V semiconductor interfaces.
  • The interaction of oxygen with the surface of a Pt alloy containing approx.20 at. % of cobalt was studied by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). At this composition, cobalt was found to be randomly substituted in the Pt fcc lattice both in the bulk and at the surface. (111) and 100) oriented single-crystal surfaces as well as polycrystalline surfaces were studied. Dosing these surfaces with oxygen at room temperature at pressures lower than approx.1 x 10/sup -5/ Torr resulted in the formation of a chemisorbed oxygen layer. At temperatures over approx.700 K dosing with oxygen inmore » the same range of pressures led to the formation of a sequence of ordered oxide overlayers. XPS and LEED data showed that the first layer to form was an epitaxial monolayer structurally equivalent to either the (111) or (100) plane of cobalt monoxide (CoO). Under conditions of controlled oxygen dosing, CoO islands of monatomic thickness nucleated and randomly decorated a nearly pure Pt surface. This surface-decoration structure was metastable over a narrow range of oxygen partial pressures and surface temperature. At higher temperatures and pressures, the oxide islands first coalesced, forming a compact monolayer that completely blocked the surface for chemisorption, then changed in stoichiometry and structure to form a structural precursor to Co/sub 3/ O/sub 4/.« less
  • In this letter, we report the electronic and chemical properties of nitrogen terminated (N-terminated) single crystal (100) diamond surface, which is a promising candidate for shallow NV{sup −} centers. N-termination is realized by an indirect RF nitrogen plasma process without inducing a large density of surface defects. Thermal stability and electronic property of N-terminated diamond surface are systematically investigated under well-controlled conditions by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron emission. An increase in the low energy cut-off of the secondary electron energy distribution curve (EDC), with respect to a bare diamond surface, indicates a positive electron affinity of themore » N-terminated diamond. Exposure to atomic hydrogen results in reorganization of N-terminated diamond to H-terminated diamond, which exhibited a negative electron affinity surface. The change in intensity and spectral features of the secondary electron EDC of the N-terminated diamond is discussed.« less
  • Oxidation of silicon during the growth of silicon oxide by ion beam sputter deposition was studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a function of oxygen partial pressure at various deposition temperatures below 600 deg. C. At low temperatures, the variation of incorporated oxygen content is similar to a dissociative adsorption isotherm of O{sub 2} on Si indicating that the surface-confined reaction of the deposited Si atoms with the adsorbed oxygen atoms is the main process. However, it shows a three-step variation with the oxygen partial pressure at high temperatures. The evolution of SiO species confirmed by the XPSmore » indicates that an adsorption-induced surface reaction and a diffusion-induced internal reaction are the main pathways for the Si oxidation.« less
  • We report on a method to prepare clean and smooth surfaces of InAs (100) along with in-situ high-resolution studies of the nanoscale oxidation of the pristine surface. A hydrogen molecular cleaning (HMC) technique has been developed that results in complete removal of native oxide. This has been verified in-depth by in-situ nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using the 16O(d,p)17O reaction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further, ion channeling studies have been performed to verify atomically smooth surfaces after post cleaning. We derive kinetic boundaries for oxide formation on cleaned InAs surfaces using NRA measurements.