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Title: Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise

Abstract

Measuring the in vivo elastic properties of muscles (e.g., stiffness) provides a means for diagnosing and monitoring muscular activity. The authors demonstrated a passive in vivo elastography technique without an active external radiation source. This technique instead uses cross correlations of contracting skeletal muscle noise recorded with skin-mounted sensors. Each passive sensor becomes a virtual in vivo shear wave source. The results point to a low-cost, noninvasive technique for monitoring biomechanical in vivo muscle properties. The efficacy of the passive elastography technique originates from the high density of cross paths between all sensor pairs, potentially achieving the same sensitivity obtained from active elastography methods.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093-0238 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971922
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 19; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2737358; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ELASTICITY; IN VIVO; MUSCLES; PATIENTS; RADIATION SOURCES; SKIN; ULTRASONOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Sabra, Karim G., Conti, Stephane, Roux, Philippe, and Kuperman, W. A. Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2737358.
Sabra, Karim G., Conti, Stephane, Roux, Philippe, & Kuperman, W. A. Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2737358.
Sabra, Karim G., Conti, Stephane, Roux, Philippe, and Kuperman, W. A. Mon . "Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2737358.
@article{osti_20971922,
title = {Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise},
author = {Sabra, Karim G. and Conti, Stephane and Roux, Philippe and Kuperman, W. A.},
abstractNote = {Measuring the in vivo elastic properties of muscles (e.g., stiffness) provides a means for diagnosing and monitoring muscular activity. The authors demonstrated a passive in vivo elastography technique without an active external radiation source. This technique instead uses cross correlations of contracting skeletal muscle noise recorded with skin-mounted sensors. Each passive sensor becomes a virtual in vivo shear wave source. The results point to a low-cost, noninvasive technique for monitoring biomechanical in vivo muscle properties. The efficacy of the passive elastography technique originates from the high density of cross paths between all sensor pairs, potentially achieving the same sensitivity obtained from active elastography methods.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2737358},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 19,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon May 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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