skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Shear strain in a shear band of a bulk-metallic glass in compression

Abstract

Using an infrared camera, the authors observe in situ the dynamic shear-banding operations in the geometrically constrained specimens of a bulk-metallic glass during compression at various strain rates. Based on the observed number of shear bands in a collection of simultaneous shear-banding operations that cause a serration, the authors calculate the shear strains in individual shear bands. The results demonstrate that the shear strain in a shear band is up to 10{sup 3}%-10{sup 4}% and dependent on strain rates. The higher the strain rates, the larger the strain in a shear band.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971897
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 18; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2734502; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS; COMPRESSION; COPPER ALLOYS; METALLIC GLASSES; NICKEL ALLOYS; RESIDUAL STRESSES; STRAIN RATE; STRAINS; TITANIUM ALLOYS; ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

Citation Formats

Jiang, W. H., Liu, F. X., Liaw, P. K., Choo, H., and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 and Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Shear strain in a shear band of a bulk-metallic glass in compression. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2734502.
Jiang, W. H., Liu, F. X., Liaw, P. K., Choo, H., & Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 and Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Shear strain in a shear band of a bulk-metallic glass in compression. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2734502.
Jiang, W. H., Liu, F. X., Liaw, P. K., Choo, H., and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 and Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Mon . "Shear strain in a shear band of a bulk-metallic glass in compression". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2734502.
@article{osti_20971897,
title = {Shear strain in a shear band of a bulk-metallic glass in compression},
author = {Jiang, W. H. and Liu, F. X. and Liaw, P. K. and Choo, H. and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 and Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831},
abstractNote = {Using an infrared camera, the authors observe in situ the dynamic shear-banding operations in the geometrically constrained specimens of a bulk-metallic glass during compression at various strain rates. Based on the observed number of shear bands in a collection of simultaneous shear-banding operations that cause a serration, the authors calculate the shear strains in individual shear bands. The results demonstrate that the shear strain in a shear band is up to 10{sup 3}%-10{sup 4}% and dependent on strain rates. The higher the strain rates, the larger the strain in a shear band.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2734502},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 18,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. Ifmore » instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.« less
  • Cited by 7
  • Cited by 7
  • It is demonstrated that at slow strain rates ({approx} 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}) in compression, the dominant room temperature macroscopic deformation mode in a ductile Zr-based bulk metallic glass is single shear along the principal shear plane. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated flow in the plastic region. Scanning electron micrographs of the deformed samples revealed regularly spaced striations on the shear surface. A detailed analysis of the observed serrations disclosed that they were intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting that the serrations were mainly caused by intermittent sample sliding. Further investigations were conducted using in situmore » compression experiments; video images showed that there was indeed a one-to-one correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. The current study therefore suggests that flow serration is a result of intermittent sample sliding. This result also implies that the principal shear plane, once formed, is the preferential site for additional shear band formation« less
  • Flow serrations recorded during inhomogeneous deformation of Zr{sub 52.5}Ti{sub 5}Cu{sub 17.9}Ni{sub 14.6}Al{sub 10} (Vit105) were studied during compression testing at temperatures between -40 and 60 deg. C. The shear band velocities determined exhibit a pronounced temperature dependence covering nearly two orders of magnitude. The velocities follow an Arrhenius-type behavior with an associated activation energy of 0.3+-0.05 eV. The results demonstrate a thermally activated mechanism of shear band propagation, which is similar to the behavior of other, nonmetallic amorphous materials.