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Title: Energy harvesting using martensite variant reorientation mechanism in a NiMnGa magnetic shape memory alloy

Abstract

Magnetic shape memory alloys demonstrate significant potential for harvesting waste mechanical energy utilizing the Villari effect. In this study, a few milliwatts of power output are achieved taking advantage of martensite variant reorientation mechanism in Ni{sub 51.1}Mn{sub 24}Ga{sub 24.9} single crystals under slowly fluctuating loads (10 Hz) without optimization in the power conversion unit. Effects of applied strain range, bias magnetic field, and loading frequency on the voltage output are revealed. Anticipated power outputs under moderate frequencies are predicted showing that the power outputs higher than 1 W are feasible.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971878
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2721143; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; GALLIUM ALLOYS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MANGANESE ALLOYS; MARTENSITE; MONOCRYSTALS; NICKEL ALLOYS; OPTIMIZATION; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; SHAPE MEMORY EFFECT

Citation Formats

Karaman, I., Basaran, B., Karaca, H. E., Karsilayan, A. I., Chumlyakov, Y. I., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843, and Siberian Physical-Technical Institute, Tomsk 634050. Energy harvesting using martensite variant reorientation mechanism in a NiMnGa magnetic shape memory alloy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2721143.
Karaman, I., Basaran, B., Karaca, H. E., Karsilayan, A. I., Chumlyakov, Y. I., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843, & Siberian Physical-Technical Institute, Tomsk 634050. Energy harvesting using martensite variant reorientation mechanism in a NiMnGa magnetic shape memory alloy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2721143.
Karaman, I., Basaran, B., Karaca, H. E., Karsilayan, A. I., Chumlyakov, Y. I., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843, and Siberian Physical-Technical Institute, Tomsk 634050. Mon . "Energy harvesting using martensite variant reorientation mechanism in a NiMnGa magnetic shape memory alloy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2721143.
@article{osti_20971878,
title = {Energy harvesting using martensite variant reorientation mechanism in a NiMnGa magnetic shape memory alloy},
author = {Karaman, I. and Basaran, B. and Karaca, H. E. and Karsilayan, A. I. and Chumlyakov, Y. I. and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 and Siberian Physical-Technical Institute, Tomsk 634050},
abstractNote = {Magnetic shape memory alloys demonstrate significant potential for harvesting waste mechanical energy utilizing the Villari effect. In this study, a few milliwatts of power output are achieved taking advantage of martensite variant reorientation mechanism in Ni{sub 51.1}Mn{sub 24}Ga{sub 24.9} single crystals under slowly fluctuating loads (10 Hz) without optimization in the power conversion unit. Effects of applied strain range, bias magnetic field, and loading frequency on the voltage output are revealed. Anticipated power outputs under moderate frequencies are predicted showing that the power outputs higher than 1 W are feasible.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2721143},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 17,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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