skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Epitaxial silicon devices for dosimetry applications

Abstract

A straightforward improvement of the efficiency and long term stability of silicon dosimeters has been obtained with a n{sup +}-p junction surrounded by a guard-ring structure implanted on an epitaxial p-type Si layer grown on a Czochralski substrate. The sensitivity of devices made on 50-{mu}m-thick epitaxial Si degrades by only 7% after an irradiation with 6 MeV electrons up to 1.5 kGy, and shows no significant further decay up to 10 kGy. These results prove the enhanced radiation tolerance and stability of epitaxial diodes as compared to present state-of-the-art Si devices.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. INFN Firenze, Department of Energetics, University of Florence, Florence 50139 (Italy)
  2. (Italy)
  3. (Norway)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971874
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2723075; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DOSEMETERS; DOSIMETRY; ELECTRON BEAMS; EPITAXY; LAYERS; MEV RANGE 01-10; NITROGEN IONS; P-N JUNCTIONS; SEMICONDUCTOR DIODES; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON; SUBSTRATES

Citation Formats

Bruzzi, M., Bucciolini, M., Casati, M., Menichelli, D., Talamonti, C., Piemonte, C., Svensson, B. G., INFN Firenze, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Florence, Florence 50134, ITC-IRST, Divisione Microsistemi, via Sommarive 18-38050 Trento, and Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo. Epitaxial silicon devices for dosimetry applications. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2723075.
Bruzzi, M., Bucciolini, M., Casati, M., Menichelli, D., Talamonti, C., Piemonte, C., Svensson, B. G., INFN Firenze, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Florence, Florence 50134, ITC-IRST, Divisione Microsistemi, via Sommarive 18-38050 Trento, & Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo. Epitaxial silicon devices for dosimetry applications. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2723075.
Bruzzi, M., Bucciolini, M., Casati, M., Menichelli, D., Talamonti, C., Piemonte, C., Svensson, B. G., INFN Firenze, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Florence, Florence 50134, ITC-IRST, Divisione Microsistemi, via Sommarive 18-38050 Trento, and Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo. Mon . "Epitaxial silicon devices for dosimetry applications". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2723075.
@article{osti_20971874,
title = {Epitaxial silicon devices for dosimetry applications},
author = {Bruzzi, M. and Bucciolini, M. and Casati, M. and Menichelli, D. and Talamonti, C. and Piemonte, C. and Svensson, B. G. and INFN Firenze, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Florence, Florence 50134 and ITC-IRST, Divisione Microsistemi, via Sommarive 18-38050 Trento and Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo},
abstractNote = {A straightforward improvement of the efficiency and long term stability of silicon dosimeters has been obtained with a n{sup +}-p junction surrounded by a guard-ring structure implanted on an epitaxial p-type Si layer grown on a Czochralski substrate. The sensitivity of devices made on 50-{mu}m-thick epitaxial Si degrades by only 7% after an irradiation with 6 MeV electrons up to 1.5 kGy, and shows no significant further decay up to 10 kGy. These results prove the enhanced radiation tolerance and stability of epitaxial diodes as compared to present state-of-the-art Si devices.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2723075},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 17,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • We have grown high quality epitaxial TiN/Si(100) and Cu/TiN/Si(100) heterostructures by pulsed laser deposition. The epitaxial TiN films have the same low (15{mu}{Omega}-cm) resistivity as TiSi{sub 2} (C-54) phase with excellent diffusion barrier properties. Auger and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the films were stoichiometric TiN and free from oxygen impurities. The x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed that the TiN films deposited at 600{degree}C were single crystal in nature with epitaxial relationship <100>TiN<100>Si. The Rutherford baskscattering channeling yield for TiN film was found to be in the range of 10-13 %. The epitaxy of Cu on TiNmore » was found to be cube-on-cube, i.e., <100>Cu<100>TiN<100> Si. The Cu/TiN and TiN/Si interfaces were found to be quite sharp without any indication of interfacial reaction. The growth mechanism of copper on TiN was found to be three dimensional. We discuss domain matching epitaxy as a mechanism of growth in these large lattice mismatch systems, where three lattice constants of Si(5.43 A) match with four of TiN(4.24 A) and seven units of Cu(3.62 A) match with six of the TiN. Thus, for next generation of device complementary metal oxide semiconductor structures, Cu/TiN/Si(100) contacts hold considerable promise, particularly since Cu is a low resistivity metal (1.6{mu}{Omega}-cm) and is considerably more resistant to electromigration than Al. 19 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • This study was carried out to determine the stability of the response of amorphous silicon (a-Si)-flat panel imagers for dosimetry applications. Measurements of the imager's response under reference conditions were performed on a regular basis for four detectors of the same manufacturer. We found that the ambient temperature influenced the dark-field, while the gain of the imager signal was unaffected. Therefore, temperature fluctuations were corrected for by applying a 'dynamic' dark-field correction. This correction method also removed the influence of a small, irreversible increase of the dark-field current, which was equal to 0.5% of the dynamic range of the imagermore » per year and was probably caused by mild radiation damage to the a-Si array. By applying a dynamic dark-field correction, excellent stability of the response over the entire panel of all imagers of 0.5% (1 SD) was obtained over an observation period up to 23 months. However, two imagers had to be replaced after several months. For one imager, an image segment stopped functioning, while the image quality of the other imager degraded significantly. We conclude that the tested a-Si EPIDs have a very stable response and are therefore well suited for dosimetry. We recommend, however, applying quality assurance tests dedicated to both imaging and dosimetry.« less
  • The physical-mechanical properties of types K-300-61 and VT-25-200 epoxy-silicon cements have been studied, together with their resistance to organic solvents, water, and type PMS-100 polymethyl siloxane fluid. The possibility of using K-300-61 cement in fabrication of semiconductor devices to assemble silicon wafers into blocks subject to mechanical treatment and annealing at 250/sup 0/C is demonstrated.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • High fidelity active dosimetry in the mixed neutron/gamma field of a research reactor is a very complex issue. For passive dosimetry applications, the use of activation foils addresses the neutron environment while the use of low neutron response CaF{sub 2}:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) addresses the gamma environment. While radiation-hardened diamond photoconducting detectors (PCD) have been developed that provide a very precise fast response (picosecond) dosimeter and can provide a time-dependent profile for the radiation environment, the mixed field response of the PCD is still uncertain and this interferes with the calibration of the PCD response. In order to address themore » research reactor experimenter's need for a dosimeter that reports silicon dose and dose rate at a test location during a pulsed reactor operation, a silicon calorimeter has been developed. This dosimeter can be used by itself to provide a dose in rad(Si) up to a point in a reactor pulsed operation, or, in conjunction with the diamond PCD, to provide a dose rate. This paper reports on the development, testing, and validation of this silicon calorimeter for applications in water-moderated research reactors.« less