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Title: Charge-induced wettability modification

Abstract

Electric charges deposited on a liquid droplet, located on a solid surface, strengthen the wetting effect. Here, the authors report on the opposite phenomenon--a decrease of wettability induced by a low-energy electron irradiation of solids. They provide evidence that the electron-induced surface charge decreases solid/liquid and solid/vapor interfacial energies when reduction of the latter is always higher. This explains the observed dependence of the droplet shape on the incident electron charge and energy, as well as on a liquid origin. This phenomenon is reversible when the charged material is subjected to ultraviolet illumination, which restores its initial state.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971869
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2711656; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DROPLETS; ELECTRIC CHARGES; ELECTRON BEAMS; IRRADIATION; SURFACE ENERGY; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; VAPORS; WETTABILITY

Citation Formats

Aronov, D., Molotskii, M., and Rosenman, G. Charge-induced wettability modification. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2711656.
Aronov, D., Molotskii, M., & Rosenman, G. Charge-induced wettability modification. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2711656.
Aronov, D., Molotskii, M., and Rosenman, G. Mon . "Charge-induced wettability modification". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2711656.
@article{osti_20971869,
title = {Charge-induced wettability modification},
author = {Aronov, D. and Molotskii, M. and Rosenman, G.},
abstractNote = {Electric charges deposited on a liquid droplet, located on a solid surface, strengthen the wetting effect. Here, the authors report on the opposite phenomenon--a decrease of wettability induced by a low-energy electron irradiation of solids. They provide evidence that the electron-induced surface charge decreases solid/liquid and solid/vapor interfacial energies when reduction of the latter is always higher. This explains the observed dependence of the droplet shape on the incident electron charge and energy, as well as on a liquid origin. This phenomenon is reversible when the charged material is subjected to ultraviolet illumination, which restores its initial state.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2711656},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 05 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 05 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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