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Title: Noncontact-mode scanning capacitance force microscopy towards quantitative two-dimensional carrier profiling on semiconductor devices

Abstract

Scanning capacitance force microscopy (SCFM) is a promising tool for investigation of two-dimensional carrier density distribution on semiconducting devices. Its sensitivity is strongly dependent on the Q factor of the mechanical resonance mode of the cantilever. Therefore, measurement in vacuum is more appropriate for increasing the sensitivity. In this letter, the authors describe noncontact-mode (NC) SCFM which is combined with the frequency modulation detection method and its signal characteristics. The authors derived a quasiquantitative calibration curve which correlates to the amplitude signal in NC-SCFM to the dopant density. Using the calibration curve, the authors obtained a quasiquantitative two-dimensional dopant density distribution map on a cross-sectional transistor device.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
  3. (Japan) and Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971848
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2454728; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CALIBRATION; CAPACITANCE; CARRIER DENSITY; CHARGE CARRIERS; FREQUENCY MODULATION; MOSFET; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SIGNALS; SILICON; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Kimura, Kenjiro, Kobayashi, Kei, Matsushige, Kazumi, Usuda, Koji, Yamada, Hirofumi, International Innovation Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520, Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510, Advanced LSI Technology Laboratory, Toshiba Corporation, Komukai-Toshiba-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8582, and Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510. Noncontact-mode scanning capacitance force microscopy towards quantitative two-dimensional carrier profiling on semiconductor devices. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2454728.
Kimura, Kenjiro, Kobayashi, Kei, Matsushige, Kazumi, Usuda, Koji, Yamada, Hirofumi, International Innovation Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520, Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510, Advanced LSI Technology Laboratory, Toshiba Corporation, Komukai-Toshiba-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8582, & Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510. Noncontact-mode scanning capacitance force microscopy towards quantitative two-dimensional carrier profiling on semiconductor devices. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2454728.
Kimura, Kenjiro, Kobayashi, Kei, Matsushige, Kazumi, Usuda, Koji, Yamada, Hirofumi, International Innovation Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520, Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510, Advanced LSI Technology Laboratory, Toshiba Corporation, Komukai-Toshiba-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8582, and Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510. Mon . "Noncontact-mode scanning capacitance force microscopy towards quantitative two-dimensional carrier profiling on semiconductor devices". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2454728.
@article{osti_20971848,
title = {Noncontact-mode scanning capacitance force microscopy towards quantitative two-dimensional carrier profiling on semiconductor devices},
author = {Kimura, Kenjiro and Kobayashi, Kei and Matsushige, Kazumi and Usuda, Koji and Yamada, Hirofumi and International Innovation Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 and Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 and Advanced LSI Technology Laboratory, Toshiba Corporation, Komukai-Toshiba-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8582 and Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510},
abstractNote = {Scanning capacitance force microscopy (SCFM) is a promising tool for investigation of two-dimensional carrier density distribution on semiconducting devices. Its sensitivity is strongly dependent on the Q factor of the mechanical resonance mode of the cantilever. Therefore, measurement in vacuum is more appropriate for increasing the sensitivity. In this letter, the authors describe noncontact-mode (NC) SCFM which is combined with the frequency modulation detection method and its signal characteristics. The authors derived a quasiquantitative calibration curve which correlates to the amplitude signal in NC-SCFM to the dopant density. Using the calibration curve, the authors obtained a quasiquantitative two-dimensional dopant density distribution map on a cross-sectional transistor device.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2454728},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Feb 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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