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Title: Size control of catalytic nanoparticles by thermal treatment and its application to diameter control of single-walled carbon nanotubes

Abstract

The authors report size control of catalytic nanoparticles by thermal annealing for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). They found that Co nanoparticle-size gradually decreased through repetitive annealing at 1000 deg. C in Ar ambient. Results of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy show that thermal evaporation is responsible for the decrease. After SWNT growth using this phenomenon, the authors found that thinner SWNTs with a narrower diameter distribution grew as the nanoparticles became smaller. Their results provide a rational and straightforward technique to prepare catalysts having a desirable size and uniformity toward diameter-controlled SWNT growth.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971787
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2433024; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANNEALING; CARBON; CATALYSIS; CATALYSTS; COBALT; CRYSTAL GROWTH; DISTRIBUTION; EVAPORATION; ION MICROPROBE ANALYSIS; MASS SPECTRA; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; NANOTUBES; PARTICLES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000-4000 K; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Jeong, Goo-Hwan, Suzuki, Satoru, Kobayashi, Yoshihiro, Yamazaki, Akira, Yoshimura, Hideyuki, Homma, Yoshikazu, Department of Physics, Meiji University, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571, and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-00112, Japan and Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo 162-8601. Size control of catalytic nanoparticles by thermal treatment and its application to diameter control of single-walled carbon nanotubes. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2433024.
Jeong, Goo-Hwan, Suzuki, Satoru, Kobayashi, Yoshihiro, Yamazaki, Akira, Yoshimura, Hideyuki, Homma, Yoshikazu, Department of Physics, Meiji University, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571, & CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-00112, Japan and Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo 162-8601. Size control of catalytic nanoparticles by thermal treatment and its application to diameter control of single-walled carbon nanotubes. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2433024.
Jeong, Goo-Hwan, Suzuki, Satoru, Kobayashi, Yoshihiro, Yamazaki, Akira, Yoshimura, Hideyuki, Homma, Yoshikazu, Department of Physics, Meiji University, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571, and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-00112, Japan and Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo 162-8601. Mon . "Size control of catalytic nanoparticles by thermal treatment and its application to diameter control of single-walled carbon nanotubes". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2433024.
@article{osti_20971787,
title = {Size control of catalytic nanoparticles by thermal treatment and its application to diameter control of single-walled carbon nanotubes},
author = {Jeong, Goo-Hwan and Suzuki, Satoru and Kobayashi, Yoshihiro and Yamazaki, Akira and Yoshimura, Hideyuki and Homma, Yoshikazu and Department of Physics, Meiji University, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-00112, Japan and Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo 162-8601},
abstractNote = {The authors report size control of catalytic nanoparticles by thermal annealing for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). They found that Co nanoparticle-size gradually decreased through repetitive annealing at 1000 deg. C in Ar ambient. Results of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy show that thermal evaporation is responsible for the decrease. After SWNT growth using this phenomenon, the authors found that thinner SWNTs with a narrower diameter distribution grew as the nanoparticles became smaller. Their results provide a rational and straightforward technique to prepare catalysts having a desirable size and uniformity toward diameter-controlled SWNT growth.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2433024},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 4,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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