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Title: Low temperature growth of crystalline magnesium oxide on hexagonal silicon carbide (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy

Abstract

Magnesium oxide (111) was grown epitaxially on hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) (0001) substrates at low temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy and a remote oxygen plasma source. The films were characterized by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Crystal structure, morphology, and growth rate of the magnesium oxide (MgO) films were found to be dependent on the magnesium flux, indicating a magnesium adsorption controlled growth mechanism. The single crystalline MgO thin films had an epitaxial relationship where MgO (111) parallel 6H-SiC (0001) and were stable in both air and 10{sup -9} Torr up to 1023 K.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971786
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436636; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ADSORPTION; AIR; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; CRYSTAL GROWTH; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; ELECTRON DIFFRACTION; MAGNESIUM; MAGNESIUM OXIDES; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; MONOCRYSTALS; MORPHOLOGY; OXYGEN; PRESSURE RANGE MICRO PA; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON CARBIDES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000-4000 K; THIN FILMS; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Goodrich, T. L., Parisi, J., Cai, Z., and Ziemer, K. S.. Low temperature growth of crystalline magnesium oxide on hexagonal silicon carbide (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436636.
Goodrich, T. L., Parisi, J., Cai, Z., & Ziemer, K. S.. Low temperature growth of crystalline magnesium oxide on hexagonal silicon carbide (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436636.
Goodrich, T. L., Parisi, J., Cai, Z., and Ziemer, K. S.. Mon . "Low temperature growth of crystalline magnesium oxide on hexagonal silicon carbide (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436636.
@article{osti_20971786,
title = {Low temperature growth of crystalline magnesium oxide on hexagonal silicon carbide (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy},
author = {Goodrich, T. L. and Parisi, J. and Cai, Z. and Ziemer, K. S.},
abstractNote = {Magnesium oxide (111) was grown epitaxially on hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) (0001) substrates at low temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy and a remote oxygen plasma source. The films were characterized by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Crystal structure, morphology, and growth rate of the magnesium oxide (MgO) films were found to be dependent on the magnesium flux, indicating a magnesium adsorption controlled growth mechanism. The single crystalline MgO thin films had an epitaxial relationship where MgO (111) parallel 6H-SiC (0001) and were stable in both air and 10{sup -9} Torr up to 1023 K.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436636},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 4,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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