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Title: Self-organized nanocrystalline stripe patterns generated during early crystallization of a nonequilibrium metallic glass

Abstract

The author reports a unique early-stage (the crystallized volume fraction {approx}0.20) self-organized nanocrystalline stripe pattern phenomenon that nanoscale phase separation and nucleation simultaneously work together, representing a type that had never been previously observed in a metastable alloy solid. The first observation of mesoscopic self-organized crystallization showed that self-organization is not limited to the case of organic matter, thus potentially offering an insight into the mechanism of the nonequilibrium (nano)crystallization of metallic glasses.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971782
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436707; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; CRYSTALLIZATION; CRYSTALS; METALLIC GLASSES; NANOSTRUCTURES; NUCLEATION; ORGANIC MATTER

Citation Formats

Li Jianmin. Self-organized nanocrystalline stripe patterns generated during early crystallization of a nonequilibrium metallic glass. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436707.
Li Jianmin. Self-organized nanocrystalline stripe patterns generated during early crystallization of a nonequilibrium metallic glass. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436707.
Li Jianmin. Mon . "Self-organized nanocrystalline stripe patterns generated during early crystallization of a nonequilibrium metallic glass". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436707.
@article{osti_20971782,
title = {Self-organized nanocrystalline stripe patterns generated during early crystallization of a nonequilibrium metallic glass},
author = {Li Jianmin},
abstractNote = {The author reports a unique early-stage (the crystallized volume fraction {approx}0.20) self-organized nanocrystalline stripe pattern phenomenon that nanoscale phase separation and nucleation simultaneously work together, representing a type that had never been previously observed in a metastable alloy solid. The first observation of mesoscopic self-organized crystallization showed that self-organization is not limited to the case of organic matter, thus potentially offering an insight into the mechanism of the nonequilibrium (nano)crystallization of metallic glasses.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436707},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 4,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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