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Title: Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

Abstract

Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from themore » insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Department of Geological Sciences
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20969920
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 22; Other Information: ingrid.pickering@usask.ca
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; SELENIUM; INSECTS; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; STREAMS; ALBERTA; CANADA; HEAVY METALS; CONTAMINATION; CHEMICAL STATE; WATER POLLUTION; UPTAKE; DIPTERA; PUPAE; TRACE AMOUNTS; SELENIDES; COAL; POLLUTION SOURCES; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; BIODEGRADATION

Citation Formats

Ruwandi Andrahennadi, Mark Wayland, and Ingrid J. Pickering. Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/es071399v.
Ruwandi Andrahennadi, Mark Wayland, & Ingrid J. Pickering. Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1021/es071399v.
Ruwandi Andrahennadi, Mark Wayland, and Ingrid J. Pickering. Thu . "Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1021/es071399v.
@article{osti_20969920,
title = {Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy},
author = {Ruwandi Andrahennadi and Mark Wayland and Ingrid J. Pickering},
abstractNote = {Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.},
doi = {10.1021/es071399v},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 22,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}