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Title: Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

Abstract

We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance {rho} and the Hall voltage V{sub Hall} characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (EDFMR) signals closely match the conventional FMR, measured simultaneously, in both resonance fields and line shapes. The sign and the magnitude of the resonant changes {delta}{rho}/{rho} and {delta}V{sub Hall}/V{sub Hall} can be consistently described in terms of a Joule heating effect. Bolometric EDFMR thus is a powerful tool for the investigation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetoresistive phenomena in ferromagnetic micro- or nanostructures.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)
  2. (Netherlands)
  3. (United States)
  4. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20960223
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2722027; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANISOTROPY; BOLOMETERS; CHROMIUM OXIDES; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; FERROMAGNETIC RESONANCE; HALL EFFECT; IRON OXIDES; JOULE HEATING; MAGNETORESISTANCE; MICROWAVE RADIATION; NANOSTRUCTURES; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Goennenwein, S. T. B., Schink, S. W., Brandlmaier, A., Boger, A., Opel, M., Gross, R., Keizer, R. S., Klapwijk, T. M., Gupta, A., Huebl, H., Bihler, C., Brandt, M. S., Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft, MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, and Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2722027.
Goennenwein, S. T. B., Schink, S. W., Brandlmaier, A., Boger, A., Opel, M., Gross, R., Keizer, R. S., Klapwijk, T. M., Gupta, A., Huebl, H., Bihler, C., Brandt, M. S., Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft, MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, & Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722027.
Goennenwein, S. T. B., Schink, S. W., Brandlmaier, A., Boger, A., Opel, M., Gross, R., Keizer, R. S., Klapwijk, T. M., Gupta, A., Huebl, H., Bihler, C., Brandt, M. S., Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft, MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, and Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching. Mon . "Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722027.
@article{osti_20960223,
title = {Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance},
author = {Goennenwein, S. T. B. and Schink, S. W. and Brandlmaier, A. and Boger, A. and Opel, M. and Gross, R. and Keizer, R. S. and Klapwijk, T. M. and Gupta, A. and Huebl, H. and Bihler, C. and Brandt, M. S. and Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft and MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching},
abstractNote = {We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance {rho} and the Hall voltage V{sub Hall} characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (EDFMR) signals closely match the conventional FMR, measured simultaneously, in both resonance fields and line shapes. The sign and the magnitude of the resonant changes {delta}{rho}/{rho} and {delta}V{sub Hall}/V{sub Hall} can be consistently described in terms of a Joule heating effect. Bolometric EDFMR thus is a powerful tool for the investigation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetoresistive phenomena in ferromagnetic micro- or nanostructures.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2722027},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 16,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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