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Title: High electron mobility InN

Abstract

Irradiation of InN films with 2 MeV He{sup +} ions followed by thermal annealing below 500 deg. C creates films with high electron concentrations and mobilities, as well as strong photoluminescence. Calculations show that electron mobility in irradiated samples is limited by triply charged donor defects. Subsequent thermal annealing removes a fraction of the defects, decreasing the electron concentration. There is a large increase in electron mobility upon annealing; the mobilities approach those of the as-grown films, which have 10 to 100 times smaller electron concentrations. Spatial ordering of the triply charged defects is suggested to cause the unusual increase in electron mobility.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20960221
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2722693; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANNEALING; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; ELECTRON DENSITY; ELECTRON MOBILITY; HELIUM IONS; INDIUM NITRIDES; ION BEAMS; IRRADIATION; MEV RANGE 01-10; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Jones, R. E., Li, S. X., Haller, E. E., van Genuchten, H. C. M., Yu, K. M., Ager, J. W. III, Liliental-Weber, Z., Walukiewicz, W., Lu, H., Schaff, W. J., Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853. High electron mobility InN. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2722693.
Jones, R. E., Li, S. X., Haller, E. E., van Genuchten, H. C. M., Yu, K. M., Ager, J. W. III, Liliental-Weber, Z., Walukiewicz, W., Lu, H., Schaff, W. J., Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, & Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853. High electron mobility InN. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722693.
Jones, R. E., Li, S. X., Haller, E. E., van Genuchten, H. C. M., Yu, K. M., Ager, J. W. III, Liliental-Weber, Z., Walukiewicz, W., Lu, H., Schaff, W. J., Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853. Mon . "High electron mobility InN". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2722693.
@article{osti_20960221,
title = {High electron mobility InN},
author = {Jones, R. E. and Li, S. X. and Haller, E. E. and van Genuchten, H. C. M. and Yu, K. M. and Ager, J. W. III and Liliental-Weber, Z. and Walukiewicz, W. and Lu, H. and Schaff, W. J. and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853},
abstractNote = {Irradiation of InN films with 2 MeV He{sup +} ions followed by thermal annealing below 500 deg. C creates films with high electron concentrations and mobilities, as well as strong photoluminescence. Calculations show that electron mobility in irradiated samples is limited by triply charged donor defects. Subsequent thermal annealing removes a fraction of the defects, decreasing the electron concentration. There is a large increase in electron mobility upon annealing; the mobilities approach those of the as-grown films, which have 10 to 100 times smaller electron concentrations. Spatial ordering of the triply charged defects is suggested to cause the unusual increase in electron mobility.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2722693},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 16,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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