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Title: Nonlinear extension of the x-ray diffraction enhanced imaging

Abstract

Diffraction enhanced imaging is the analyzer-based x-ray imaging technique which allows extraction of the refraction and absorption contrasts from two images taken on the opposite sides of the rocking curve of the analyzer. It is widely used in different fields of science. However, the information provided by the method is qualitative rather than quantitative. This happens because either side of the rocking curve is approximated as a line. One can overcome this problem of considering the rocking curve instead of the approximation. This letter is dedicated to the implementation of this idea and includes theoretical background and experimental validation.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20960218
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 15; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2721378; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ABSORPTION; APPROXIMATIONS; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; REFRACTION; VALIDATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Maksimenko, Anton. Nonlinear extension of the x-ray diffraction enhanced imaging. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2721378.
Maksimenko, Anton. Nonlinear extension of the x-ray diffraction enhanced imaging. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2721378.
Maksimenko, Anton. Mon . "Nonlinear extension of the x-ray diffraction enhanced imaging". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2721378.
@article{osti_20960218,
title = {Nonlinear extension of the x-ray diffraction enhanced imaging},
author = {Maksimenko, Anton},
abstractNote = {Diffraction enhanced imaging is the analyzer-based x-ray imaging technique which allows extraction of the refraction and absorption contrasts from two images taken on the opposite sides of the rocking curve of the analyzer. It is widely used in different fields of science. However, the information provided by the method is qualitative rather than quantitative. This happens because either side of the rocking curve is approximated as a line. One can overcome this problem of considering the rocking curve instead of the approximation. This letter is dedicated to the implementation of this idea and includes theoretical background and experimental validation.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2721378},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 15,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 09 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 09 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • For detailed biomedical observations using the optimum phase-contrast x-ray imaging, quantitative comparisons of imaging performances of two major imaging methods--x-ray interferometric imaging (XII) and diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI)--were performed. Density sensitivity and spatial resolution of each imaging method were evaluated using phantom tomograms obtained by each method with the same x-ray dosage. For practical comparison of the methods, biological samples were also observed under the same conditions. The results show that XII has a higher sensitivity than that of DEI and is thus suitable for observation of soft biological tissues. On the other hand, DEI has a wider dynamic rangemore » of density and is thus suitable for observation of samples with large differences in density of different regions.« less
  • The X-ray Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) is the analyzer-based X-ray imaging technique which allows extraction of the 'pure refraction' and 'apparent absorption' contrasts from two images taken on the opposite sides of the rocking curve of the analyzing crystal. The refraction contrast obtained by this method shows many advantages over conventional absorption contrast. It was successfully applied in medicine, technique and other fields of science. However, information provided by the method is rather qualitative than quantitative. This happens because either side of the rocking curve of the analyzer is approximated as a straight line what limits the ranges of applicabilitymore » and introduces additional error. One can easily overcome this problem considering the rocking curve as is instead of it's Taylor's expansion. This report is dedicated to the application of this idea in medical imaging and especially computed tomography based on the refraction contrast. The results obtained via both methods are presented and compared.« less
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  • No abstract prepared.