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Title: Semen quality detection using time of flight and acoustic wave sensors

Abstract

The authors report a real-time technique for assessing the number of motile sperm in a semen sample. The time of flight technique uses a flow channel with detection at the end of the channel using quartz crystal microbalances. Data presented suggest that a simple rigid mass model may be used in interpreting the change in resonant frequency using an effective mass for the sperm.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. School of Biomedical and Natural Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20960217
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 15; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2721858; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CRYSTALS; EFFECTIVE MASS; MICROBALANCES; QUARTZ; SENSORS; SOUND WAVES; SPERMATOZOA; TIME-OF-FLIGHT METHOD

Citation Formats

Newton, M. I., Evans, C. R., Simons, J. J., and Hughes, D. C. Semen quality detection using time of flight and acoustic wave sensors. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2721858.
Newton, M. I., Evans, C. R., Simons, J. J., & Hughes, D. C. Semen quality detection using time of flight and acoustic wave sensors. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2721858.
Newton, M. I., Evans, C. R., Simons, J. J., and Hughes, D. C. Mon . "Semen quality detection using time of flight and acoustic wave sensors". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2721858.
@article{osti_20960217,
title = {Semen quality detection using time of flight and acoustic wave sensors},
author = {Newton, M. I. and Evans, C. R. and Simons, J. J. and Hughes, D. C.},
abstractNote = {The authors report a real-time technique for assessing the number of motile sperm in a semen sample. The time of flight technique uses a flow channel with detection at the end of the channel using quartz crystal microbalances. Data presented suggest that a simple rigid mass model may be used in interpreting the change in resonant frequency using an effective mass for the sperm.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2721858},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 15,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 09 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 09 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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