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Title: Self-limiting growth of tantalum oxide thin films by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

Abstract

Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films were fabricated by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with simultaneous delivery of O{sub 2} and the metal precursor. By appropriately controlling the gas-phase environment self-limiting deposition at controllable rates ({approx}1 A ring /pulse) was obtained. The process was insensitive to substrate temperature, with a constant deposition rate observed from 90 to 350 deg. C. As-deposited Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} films under these conditions displayed good dielectric properties. Performance improvements correlate strongly with film density and composition as measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Pulsed PECVD eliminates the need for gas actuation and inert purge steps required by atomic layer deposition.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 and CMD Research LLC, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20960175
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 13; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2716310; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; COATINGS; CRYSTAL GROWTH; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES; ELLIPSOMETRY; FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS; FOURIER TRANSFORMATION; INFRARED SPECTRA; LAYERS; PERFORMANCE; PLASMA; SUBSTRATES; TANTALUM OXIDES; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Seman, Michael, Robbins, Joshua J., Agarwal, Sumit, Wolden, Colin A., CMD Research LLC, Golden, Colorado 80401, and Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401. Self-limiting growth of tantalum oxide thin films by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2716310.
Seman, Michael, Robbins, Joshua J., Agarwal, Sumit, Wolden, Colin A., CMD Research LLC, Golden, Colorado 80401, & Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401. Self-limiting growth of tantalum oxide thin films by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2716310.
Seman, Michael, Robbins, Joshua J., Agarwal, Sumit, Wolden, Colin A., CMD Research LLC, Golden, Colorado 80401, and Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401. Mon . "Self-limiting growth of tantalum oxide thin films by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2716310.
@article{osti_20960175,
title = {Self-limiting growth of tantalum oxide thin films by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition},
author = {Seman, Michael and Robbins, Joshua J. and Agarwal, Sumit and Wolden, Colin A. and CMD Research LLC, Golden, Colorado 80401 and Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401},
abstractNote = {Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films were fabricated by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with simultaneous delivery of O{sub 2} and the metal precursor. By appropriately controlling the gas-phase environment self-limiting deposition at controllable rates ({approx}1 A ring /pulse) was obtained. The process was insensitive to substrate temperature, with a constant deposition rate observed from 90 to 350 deg. C. As-deposited Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} films under these conditions displayed good dielectric properties. Performance improvements correlate strongly with film density and composition as measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Pulsed PECVD eliminates the need for gas actuation and inert purge steps required by atomic layer deposition.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2716310},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 13,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 26 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 26 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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